Element 1.1.2 Child-centred Each child’s current knowledge, strengths, ideas, culture, abilities and interests are the foundation of the program.

Click on the button below that best describes you and follow the simple steps. Complete each step as it will automatically write your QIP and Self Assessment Tool.

Educators

The key to this Element 1.1.2 Child-centred is building a relationship with your families so you can get to know children’s current knowledge, culture and interest to create curriculum.

  • Children’s current knowledge can be described as how they understand and make sense of the world around them.
  • Children’s culture can be defined as their family’s values, beliefs and traditions.
  • Children’s interests include their hobbies, current favourite games or toys or current learning passions.

For educators to understand these points, they must show a genuine interest in the children to create strong relationships with families which in turn sees families provide insight into their child’s life. It can be as simple as asking the first question and they do not have to be formal. Educators can ask the families questions about their children’s lives during orientation, drop off and pick up, phone calls or through social media like closed Facebook groups or email.

Questions Educators can ask:

  • What did the family do on the weekend?
  • What are their child’s current interests?
  • What family traditions do they have and celebrate?

As educators gain this information, they must then create curriculum. To do this, the educator must continually ask “what do the children know, can do and understand?” Then educators decide how to extend on what children know, can do and understand.

Following are case studies from centres who have mastered element 1.1.2.

Children’s Interests: Sausage Master class

In the Preschool room, Miss Chelsea had a conversation with Izzy’s Mum who explained Izzy enjoys cooking. Miss Chelsea then organised an experience for the children to make sausages from scratch. Miss Chelsea discussed health and hygiene with the children while cooking, safety precautions while using the knives, and how they could follow on Izzy’s interest by making sausages at home. All children were engaged throughout this process. Miss Chelsea then posted in the closed Facebook group asking families to provide feedback on what they thought and felt about this experience.

Children’s Culture: Aboriginal Painting

In the Junior Preschool room, Maalaa was very open and excited to discuss with her friends and educators about her Indigenous culture. The educators wanted to provide Maalaa with an opportunity to help explain parts of her culture to her class. The educators organised with Maalaa’s family to bring in some ochre. This was what the Aboriginal people used to paint with. It’s made from minerals found in soil or charcoal. Maalaa, her Mum and the educators, discussed with the children about ochre painting before the children each engaged in painting a  rock with some ochre.

Children’s Current Knowledge: Football

In the Toddler room, a few of the children enjoy playing football during outdoor play. When Miss Jess joined in with the boys, it became apparent to her that the children had great football skills. They knew how to hold the ball properly and how to kick. To further extend on their current knowledge, Miss Jess organised a children’s football team to visit the centre. The football coaches had a football for each child as they demonstrated and supported the children to learn more football techniques including correctly passing the ball, how to hold the ball tightly and how to play the ball.

During these experiences, the children were focused throughout and took home lots of information. Extending on from what children know, can do, understand and want to learn can make a huge difference to their learning. It helps to think ‘outside the box’ for ideas on ways to extend learning.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. Please answer the following three points.

  1. Give me an example of how you get to know about child’s culture.
  2. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child’s strengths and abilities are.
  3. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child is interested in; what they know about their interest and their ideas about how you and the child learn more about the interest.

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

As there are no specific Regulations for Element 4.2.2 Professional Collaboration,  we suggest you watch this YouTube video which is also available as a podcast on services like Spotify. In this entertaining clip Celeste Headlee discusses the 10 ways to effectively engage in conversation:

  1. Don’t multitask
  2. Don’t pontificate – assume you have something to learn
  3. Use open-ended questions – who , what, when, where, why or how
  4. Go with the flow
  5. If you don’t know, say you don’t know
  6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs
  7. Try not to repeat yourself
  8. Stay out of the weeds -forget the names, dates, details
  9. Listen – with the intent to understand
  10. Be brief

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • The children in the room are disruptive and do lots of running. The children never engage in the environment or activities planned. Their attention span is really lacking

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I told her she’d have to leave and maybe I could talk with her later when I wasn’t so busy.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.2 on pages 220-221 of the NQS Guide

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing!


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide

We have assessed ourselves against the outcomes and are confident all educators deliver a child- centred program. For example, preschool educator Eliza begins each day with a group time where she asks all children what activities they wish to do for the day. This valuable knowledge is combined with what parents want their child to learn and it is written on the whiteboard and implemented during the day (embedded practices and engagement with families). For example, on the (13.2.19) Stella mentioned she would enjoy dancing, Aria wanted to play with playdough and Alex wanted to draw. Ella’s Mum mentioned Ella had been practicing her name writing at home, to begin getting ready for school. Miss Eliza set the program for the day to include all children extending and working on their writing skills.

 

This daily practice was developed after Eliza reflected on what she called a great day and wondered what made it great. (Critical reflection See reflection 13.2.19) She noticed these great days included large amounts of time where the children had decided what they wanted to do, which in turn saw the children engaged for longer. Children would often ask to return to an experience so they could practice.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

National Quality Framework Policy

We are covered by and value the National Quality Framework which includes the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF), the National Education and Care Law and Regulations, and the National Quality Standard covering seven Quality Areas:

  1. Educational program and practice
  2. Children’s health and safety
  3. Physical environment
  4. Staffing arrangements
  5. Relationships with children
  6. Collaborative partnerships with families and communities
  7. Governance and Leadership

Services are assessed and rated on their performance. Rating levels include excellent, exceeding, meeting, working towards and significant improvement required.

We are committed to the continuous improvement of our practices and seek and value input from families and our community, including in respect of our Quality Improvement Plan.

Room/Group Leader

  1. Set a goal for the week.
    Goal doesn’t always need to link to NQS Element. A goal can be used to solve a challenge or be positive improvement i.e. learning area setup
    Click here for goal template.
  2. Identify barriers
  3. Track the goal daily
  4. Celebrate achieved goal.

The key to this Element 1.1.2 Child-centred is building a relationship with your families so you can get to know children’s current knowledge, culture and interest to create curriculum.

  • Children’s current knowledge can be described as how they understand and make sense of the world around them.
  • Children’s culture can be defined as their family’s values, beliefs and traditions.
  • Children’s interests include their hobbies, current favourite games or toys or current learning passions.

For educators to understand these points, they must show a genuine interest in the children to create strong relationships with families which in turn sees families provide insight into their child’s life. It can be as simple as asking the first question and they do not have to be formal. Educators can ask the families questions about their children’s lives during orientation, drop off and pick up, phone calls or through social media like closed Facebook groups or email.

Questions Educators can ask:

  • What did the family do on the weekend?
  • What are their child’s current interests?
  • What family traditions do they have and celebrate?

As educators gain this information, they must then create curriculum. To do this, the educator must continually ask “what do the children know, can do and understand?” Then educators decide how to extend on what children know, can do and understand.

Following are case studies from centres who have mastered element 1.1.2.

Children’s Interests: Sausage Master class

In the Preschool room, Miss Chelsea had a conversation with Izzy’s Mum who explained Izzy enjoys cooking. Miss Chelsea then organised an experience for the children to make sausages from scratch. Miss Chelsea discussed health and hygiene with the children while cooking, safety precautions while using the knives, and how they could follow on Izzy’s interest by making sausages at home. All children were engaged throughout this process. Miss Chelsea then posted in the closed Facebook group asking families to provide feedback on what they thought and felt about this experience.

Children’s Culture: Aboriginal Painting

In the Junior Preschool room, Maalaa was very open and excited to discuss with her friends and educators about her Indigenous culture. The educators wanted to provide Maalaa with an opportunity to help explain parts of her culture to her class. The educators organised with Maalaa’s family to bring in some ochre. This was what the Aboriginal people used to paint with. It’s made from minerals found in soil or charcoal. Maalaa, her Mum and the educators, discussed with the children about ochre painting before the children each engaged in painting a  rock with some ochre.

Children’s Current Knowledge: Football

In the Toddler room, a few of the children enjoy playing football during outdoor play. When Miss Jess joined in with the boys, it became apparent to her that the children had great football skills. They knew how to hold the ball properly and how to kick. To further extend on their current knowledge, Miss Jess organised a children’s football team to visit the centre. The football coaches had a football for each child as they demonstrated and supported the children to learn more football techniques including correctly passing the ball, how to hold the ball tightly and how to play the ball.

During these experiences, the children were focused throughout and took home lots of information. Extending on from what children know, can do, understand and want to learn can make a huge difference to their learning. It helps to think ‘outside the box’ for ideas on ways to extend learning.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. Please answer the following three points.

  1. Give me an example of how you get to know about child’s culture.
  2. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child’s strengths and abilities are.
  3. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child is interested in; what they know about their interest and their ideas about how you and the child learn more about the interest.

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

As there are no specific Regulations for Element 4.2.2 Professional Collaboration,  we suggest you watch this YouTube video which is also available as a podcast on services like Spotify. In this entertaining clip Celeste Headlee discusses the 10 ways to effectively engage in conversation:

  1. Don’t multitask
  2. Don’t pontificate – assume you have something to learn
  3. Use open-ended questions – who , what, when, where, why or how
  4. Go with the flow
  5. If you don’t know, say you don’t know
  6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs
  7. Try not to repeat yourself
  8. Stay out of the weeds -forget the names, dates, details
  9. Listen – with the intent to understand
  10. Be brief

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Do you and your team regularly assess your practice against the service philosophy?
  • Would all staff agree you always keep confidential information about children, families

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I told her she’d have to leave and maybe I could talk with her later when I wasn’t so busy.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.2 on pages 220-221 of the NQS Guide

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing!


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. Promoting open and respectful communication I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. I encouraged her to explain in detail how Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing! I made sure she saw all the children’s efforts and explained how much fun they’d had completing their artworks.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

National Quality Framework Policy

We are covered by and value the National Quality Framework which includes the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF), the National Education and Care Law and Regulations, and the National Quality Standard covering seven Quality Areas:

  1. Educational program and practice
  2. Children’s health and safety
  3. Physical environment
  4. Staffing arrangements
  5. Relationships with children
  6. Collaborative partnerships with families and communities
  7. Governance and Leadership

Services are assessed and rated on their performance. Rating levels include excellent, exceeding, meeting, working towards and significant improvement required.

We are committed to the continuous improvement of our practices and seek and value input from families and our community, including in respect of our Quality Improvement Plan.

Educational Leader

The key to this Element 1.1.2 Child-centred is building a relationship with your families so you can get to know children’s current knowledge, culture and interest to create curriculum.

  • Children’s current knowledge can be described as how they understand and make sense of the world around them.
  • Children’s culture can be defined as their family’s values, beliefs and traditions.
  • Children’s interests include their hobbies, current favourite games or toys or current learning passions.

For educators to understand these points, they must show a genuine interest in the children to create strong relationships with families which in turn sees families provide insight into their child’s life. It can be as simple as asking the first question and they do not have to be formal. Educators can ask the families questions about their children’s lives during orientation, drop off and pick up, phone calls or through social media like closed Facebook groups or email.

Questions Educators can ask:

  • What did the family do on the weekend?
  • What are their child’s current interests?
  • What family traditions do they have and celebrate?

As educators gain this information, they must then create curriculum. To do this, the educator must continually ask “what do the children know, can do and understand?” Then educators decide how to extend on what children know, can do and understand.

Following are case studies from centres who have mastered element 1.1.2.

Children’s Interests: Sausage Master class

In the Preschool room, Miss Chelsea had a conversation with Izzy’s Mum who explained Izzy enjoys cooking. Miss Chelsea then organised an experience for the children to make sausages from scratch. Miss Chelsea discussed health and hygiene with the children while cooking, safety precautions while using the knives, and how they could follow on Izzy’s interest by making sausages at home. All children were engaged throughout this process. Miss Chelsea then posted in the closed Facebook group asking families to provide feedback on what they thought and felt about this experience.

Children’s Culture: Aboriginal Painting

In the Junior Preschool room, Maalaa was very open and excited to discuss with her friends and educators about her Indigenous culture. The educators wanted to provide Maalaa with an opportunity to help explain parts of her culture to her class. The educators organised with Maalaa’s family to bring in some ochre. This was what the Aboriginal people used to paint with. It’s made from minerals found in soil or charcoal. Maalaa, her Mum and the educators, discussed with the children about ochre painting before the children each engaged in painting a  rock with some ochre.

Children’s Current Knowledge: Football

In the Toddler room, a few of the children enjoy playing football during outdoor play. When Miss Jess joined in with the boys, it became apparent to her that the children had great football skills. They knew how to hold the ball properly and how to kick. To further extend on their current knowledge, Miss Jess organised a children’s football team to visit the centre. The football coaches had a football for each child as they demonstrated and supported the children to learn more football techniques including correctly passing the ball, how to hold the ball tightly and how to play the ball.

During these experiences, the children were focused throughout and took home lots of information. Extending on from what children know, can do, understand and want to learn can make a huge difference to their learning. It helps to think ‘outside the box’ for ideas on ways to extend learning.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. Please answer the following three points.

  1. Give me an example of how you get to know about child’s culture.
  2. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child’s strengths and abilities are.
  3. Give me an example of how you get to know what a child is interested in; what they know about their interest and their ideas about how you and the child learn more about the interest.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Do you and your team regularly assess your practice against the service philosophy?
  • Would all staff agree you always keep confidential information about children, families

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I told her she’d have to leave and maybe I could talk with her later when I wasn’t so busy.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.2 on pages 220-221 of the NQS Guide

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing!


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. Promoting open and respectful communication I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. I encouraged her to explain in detail how Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing! I made sure she saw all the children’s efforts and explained how much fun they’d had completing their artworks.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Nominated Supervisor

The key to this Element 1.1.2 Child-centred is building a relationship with your families so you can get to know children’s current knowledge, culture and interest to create curriculum.

  • Children’s current knowledge can be described as how they understand and make sense of the world around them.
  • Children’s culture can be defined as their family’s values, beliefs and traditions.
  • Children’s interests include their hobbies, current favourite games or toys or current learning passions.

For educators to understand these points, they must show a genuine interest in the children to create strong relationships with families which in turn sees families provide insight into their child’s life. It can be as simple as asking the first question and they do not have to be formal. Educators can ask the families questions about their children’s lives during orientation, drop off and pick up, phone calls or through social media like closed Facebook groups or email.

Questions Educators can ask:

  • What did the family do on the weekend?
  • What are their child’s current interests?
  • What family traditions do they have and celebrate?

As educators gain this information, they must then create curriculum. To do this, the educator must continually ask “what do the children know, can do and understand?” Then educators decide how to extend on what children know, can do and understand.

Following are case studies from centres who have mastered element 1.1.2.

Children’s Interests: Sausage Master class

In the Preschool room, Miss Chelsea had a conversation with Izzy’s Mum who explained Izzy enjoys cooking. Miss Chelsea then organised an experience for the children to make sausages from scratch. Miss Chelsea discussed health and hygiene with the children while cooking, safety precautions while using the knives, and how they could follow on Izzy’s interest by making sausages at home. All children were engaged throughout this process. Miss Chelsea then posted in the closed Facebook group asking families to provide feedback on what they thought and felt about this experience.

Children’s Culture: Aboriginal Painting

In the Junior Preschool room, Maalaa was very open and excited to discuss with her friends and educators about her Indigenous culture. The educators wanted to provide Maalaa with an opportunity to help explain parts of her culture to her class. The educators organised with Maalaa’s family to bring in some ochre. This was what the Aboriginal people used to paint with. It’s made from minerals found in soil or charcoal. Maalaa, her Mum and the educators, discussed with the children about ochre painting before the children each engaged in painting a  rock with some ochre.

Children’s Current Knowledge: Football

In the Toddler room, a few of the children enjoy playing football during outdoor play. When Miss Jess joined in with the boys, it became apparent to her that the children had great football skills. They knew how to hold the ball properly and how to kick. To further extend on their current knowledge, Miss Jess organised a children’s football team to visit the centre. The football coaches had a football for each child as they demonstrated and supported the children to learn more football techniques including correctly passing the ball, how to hold the ball tightly and how to play the ball.

During these experiences, the children were focused throughout and took home lots of information. Extending on from what children know, can do, understand and want to learn can make a huge difference to their learning. It helps to think ‘outside the box’ for ideas on ways to extend learning.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Do you and your team regularly assess your practice against the service philosophy?
  • Would all staff agree you always keep confidential information about children, families

Your team crave feedback on their weekly Centre Support professional development.
Getting appropriate feedback and seeing actions which come from their comments and reflections inspires them to keep on completing the professional development. It’s important therefore that you read the Educators’ section and make sure you and/or the Educational Leader:

  • action the checklist results eg if educators ask for help by answering ‘T’ they get the help they need
  • follow up their critical reflection ie help implement outcomes
  • use their QIP contributions and celebrate them with your educators.

7. Celebrate and document what you do well (10-12 minutes) Friday

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I told her she’d have to leave and maybe I could talk with her later when I wasn’t so busy.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.2 on pages 220-221 of the NQS Guide

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing!


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Tyrone’s mum was trying to tell me about her weekend when I (Miss Crystal) was really busy organising an activity and supervising the children. Promoting open and respectful communication I said I’d love to hear more about what happened, and asked if she could come in 5 minutes earlier than usual to collect Tyrone when I’d have time to give her my full attention. She did and it was amazing hearing about their visit to Grandma’s house. I encouraged her to explain in detail how Grandma tied squeezy bottles of paint from the ceiling with string and placed large sheets of ‘butcher’s’ paper on the floor so Tyrone could experiment with squeezing and moving the bottles to create unique masterpieces! I said that was a great idea and we would definitely be trying that with all our children. Thanks for sharing! I made sure she saw all the children’s efforts and explained how much fun they’d had completing their artworks.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.