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Element 2.2.2 Incident and emergency management – Plans to effectively manage incidents and emergencies are developed in consultation with relevant authorities, practised and implemented.

Click on the button below that best describes you and follow the simple steps. Complete each step as it will automatically write your QIP and Self Assessment Tool.

Educators

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you include learning about emergencies, including emergency rehearsals, in the curriculum to promote learning outcomes?
  2. Do you let families know about upcoming emergency rehearsals and discuss emergency procedures with them?
  3. Do you contribute to evaluations of emergency rehearsals?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

  • Law section 51(1)(a) Conditions on service approval (safety, health and wellbeing of children)
  • Regulation 97 Emergency and evacuation procedures
  • Regulation 98 Telephone or other communication equipment
  • Regulation 168 Education and care service must have policies and procedures

Who has to do what?

You must ensure:

  • children are safe at all times
  • help identify ALL potential emergencies the Service could face including things like severe dust storms and snakes
  • participate in rehearsals of emergency procedures for ALL potential emergencies identified at least once every 3 months, and help evaluate rehearsal
  • evacuation floor plan and instructions are displayed near each exit.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Could you discuss how you make sure children understand how to identify an emergency, and what to do, in a way that builds familiarity but not undue concern?
  • Would team members agree you take emergency rehearsals seriously ie as if there was a real emergency?
  • Could you discuss ALL Service emergency procedures with an assessor? If not, what don’t you know?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine. Sometimes we skip a few things so we can just get it done. It’s just not practical for example moving children who are resting, or asking all staff to join in.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 2.2.2 on pages 168-169 of the NQS Guide.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file).


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 172-174.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file). We also get advice about our emergency procedures from relevant authorities. Last week, for example, the local fire brigade visited (see curriculum all rooms 7_9_20) and the Nominated Supervisor asked them to review our procedures during the visit. They suggested we consider moving our assembly point a little closer given our original point is also being used by the local high school. We’ve changed our practices and procedures as a result (see procedure file).

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy

Services must:

  • conduct a risk assessment to identify all potential emergencies that could affect the service and use this to prepare emergency and evacuation procedures
  • prepare an Emergency Management Plan that covers all potential risks, emergency response procedures, contact details for emergency services and service personnel, drills and training schedules
  • have access to reliable communication equipment during emergencies (eg charged mobile phone)
  • have a prepared emergency evacuation kit stocked with all necessary items
  • display evacuation diagrams and emergency telephone numbers
  • rehearse all emergency evacuation procedures at least every three months, on different days/times each quarter.

Lockdown Policy

Examples of critical incidents requiring lockdown may include a siege of service property, aggressive trespasses or a disaster in the local community. Policy contains lockdown procedures including:

  • ringing 000 immediately if emergency services required
  • notifying lockdown eg via alarm
  • immediately moving people outside inside into their rooms, preferably under desks or out of sight, until all clear signal is given
  • checking sign-in sheet to ensure everyone is present.

Bushfire Policy

Contains service procedures to prevent/minimise impact of bushfires and actions required during total fire bans, when there is a local fire, when a bushfire is threatening the premises, and after a bushfire. Some key aspects of the policy include:

  • educators monitoring fire danger ratings daily during peak fire season
  • trimming trees within 2 metres of building and keeping gutters clean
  • maintaining a bushfire/emergency evacuation kit
  • ensuring outdoor taps are working, have hoses attached and buckets nearby during very high, severe or extreme fire danger ratings
  • ensuring family contacts are current and accessible
  • ensuring children have their asthma medication.

Room/Group Leader

  1. Set a goal for the week.
    Goal doesn’t always need to link to NQS Element. A goal can be used to solve a challenge or be positive improvement i.e. learning area setup
    Click here for goal template.
  2. Identify barriers
  3. Track the goal daily
  4. Celebrate achieved goal.

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you include learning about emergencies, including emergency rehearsals, in the curriculum to promote learning outcomes?
  2. Do you let families know about upcoming emergency rehearsals and discuss emergency procedures with them?
  3. Do you contribute to evaluations of emergency rehearsals?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

  • Law section 51(1)(a) Conditions on service approval (safety, health and wellbeing of children)
  • Regulation 97 Emergency and evacuation procedures
  • Regulation 98 Telephone or other communication equipment
  • Regulation 168 Education and care service must have policies and procedures

Who has to do what?

You must ensure:

  • children are safe at all times
  • help identify ALL potential emergencies the Service could face including things like severe dust storms and snakes
  • participate in rehearsals of emergency procedures for ALL potential emergencies identified at least once every 3 months, and help evaluate rehearsal
  • evacuation floor plan and instructions are displayed near each exit.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Could you discuss how you make sure children understand how to identify an emergency, and what to do, in a way that builds familiarity but not undue concern?
  • Would team members agree you take emergency rehearsals seriously ie as if there was a real emergency?
  • Could you discuss ALL Service emergency procedures with an assessor? If not, what don’t you know?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine. Sometimes we skip a few things so we can just get it done. It’s just not practical for example moving children who are resting, or asking all staff to join in.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 2.2.2 on pages 168-169 of the NQS Guide.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file).


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 172-174.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file). We also get advice about our emergency procedures from relevant authorities. Last week, for example, the local fire brigade visited (see curriculum all rooms 7_9_20) and the Nominated Supervisor asked them to review our procedures during the visit. They suggested we consider moving our assembly point a little closer given our original point is also being used by the local high school. We’ve changed our practices and procedures as a result (see procedure file).

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Emergency Management and Evacuation Policy

Services must:

  • conduct a risk assessment to identify all potential emergencies that could affect the service and use this to prepare emergency and evacuation procedures
  • prepare an Emergency Management Plan that covers all potential risks, emergency response procedures, contact details for emergency services and service personnel, drills and training schedules
  • have access to reliable communication equipment during emergencies (eg charged mobile phone)
  • have a prepared emergency evacuation kit stocked with all necessary items
  • display evacuation diagrams and emergency telephone numbers
  • rehearse all emergency evacuation procedures at least every three months, on different days/times each quarter.

Lockdown Policy

Examples of critical incidents requiring lockdown may include a siege of service property, aggressive trespasses or a disaster in the local community. Policy contains lockdown procedures including:

  • ringing 000 immediately if emergency services required
  • notifying lockdown eg via alarm
  • immediately moving people outside inside into their rooms, preferably under desks or out of sight, until all clear signal is given
  • checking sign-in sheet to ensure everyone is present.

Bushfire Policy

Contains service procedures to prevent/minimise impact of bushfires and actions required during total fire bans, when there is a local fire, when a bushfire is threatening the premises, and after a bushfire. Some key aspects of the policy include:

  • educators monitoring fire danger ratings daily during peak fire season
  • trimming trees within 2 metres of building and keeping gutters clean
  • maintaining a bushfire/emergency evacuation kit
  • ensuring outdoor taps are working, have hoses attached and buckets nearby during very high, severe or extreme fire danger ratings
  • ensuring family contacts are current and accessible
  • ensuring children have their asthma medication.

Educational Leader

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you include learning about emergencies, including emergency rehearsals, in the curriculum to promote learning outcomes?
  2. Do you let families know about upcoming emergency rehearsals and discuss emergency procedures with them?
  3. Do you contribute to evaluations of emergency rehearsals?

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Do you and your team regularly assess your practice against the service philosophy?
  • Would all staff agree you always keep confidential information about children, families and other staff private?
  • Would all families and staff agree you’re always polite, respectful and professional when interacting with them or the children?
  • Would all staff agree you’re always willing to try new ideas?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine. Sometimes we skip a few things so we can just get it done. It’s just not practical for example moving children who are resting, or asking all staff to join in.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 2.2.2 on pages 168-169 of the NQS Guide.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file).


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 172-174.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file). We also get advice about our emergency procedures from relevant authorities. Last week, for example, the local fire brigade visited (see curriculum all rooms 7_9_20) and the Nominated Supervisor asked them to review our procedures during the visit. They suggested we consider moving our assembly point a little closer given our original point is also being used by the local high school. We’ve changed our practices and procedures as a result (see procedure file).

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Nominated Supervisor

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Do you and your team regularly assess your practice against the service philosophy?
  • Would all staff agree you always keep confidential information about children, families and other staff private?
  • Would all families and staff agree you’re always polite, respectful and professional when interacting with them or the children?
  • Would all staff agree you’re always willing to try new ideas?

Your team crave feedback on their weekly Centre Support professional development.

Getting appropriate feedback and seeing actions which come from their comments and reflections inspires them to keep on completing the professional development. It’s important therefore that you read the Educators’ section and make sure you and/or the Educational Leader:

  • action the checklist results eg if educators ask for help by answering ‘T’ they get the help they need
  • follow up their critical reflection ie help implement outcomes
  • use their QIP contributions and celebrate them with your educators.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine. Sometimes we skip a few things so we can just get it done. It’s just not practical for example moving children who are resting, or asking all staff to join in.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 2.2.2 on pages 168-169 of the NQS Guide.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file).


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 172-174.

It’s really hard fitting emergency rehearsals into the daily routine, but we know how important they are. We recently rehearsed our emergency evacuation procedure and realised that we needed an extra emergency evacuation cot because our babies wouldn’t all fit in one cot now we’ve had more enrolments. Just as well we always take our rehearsals seriously and include everyone present (see emergency rehearsal file). We also get advice about our emergency procedures from relevant authorities. Last week, for example, the local fire brigade visited (see curriculum all rooms 7_9_20) and the Nominated Supervisor asked them to review our procedures during the visit. They suggested we consider moving our assembly point a little closer given our original point is also being used by the local high school. We’ve changed our practices and procedures as a result (see procedure file).

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

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