Element 3.2.1 Inclusive environment – Outdoor and indoor spaces are organised and adapted to support every child’s participation and to engage every child in quality experiences in both built and natural environments.

Click on the button below that best describes you and follow the simple steps. Complete each step as it will automatically write your QIP and Self Assessment Tool.

Educators

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for children to engage in social or solitary play according to their individual needs and preferences?
  2. Do you change or adapt resources where required to ensure each child can successfully participate?
  3. Do you help organise indoor and outdoor spaces where children can play or relax on their own or in a small group without interruption eg by adults or other children moving through the area?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

Regulation 113 Outdoor Environment

Who has to do what?

Educators must provide children with opportunities to explore natural settings and resources in outside play areas eg gardens, sandpits, dirt patches, pebble/gravel pits, edible plants, shady trees, worm farms, compost areas, water play areas, logs, rocks, hay bales, tree stumps and potted plants.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would families/children agree you monitor noise levels and implement strategies to reduce noise if needed?
  • Would families/children agree you always support activities started by or suggested by children?
  • Would families agree the indoor and outdoor environments look attractive?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha laughed and said she’d heard stories like this from other families and she thought it was just luck whether you got an ‘easy’ child or a child with more challenging behaviour.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 3.2.1 on pages 192-194 of the NQS Guide.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 200-201.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources as needed during the day to create a flexible and inclusive space where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Physical Environment (WHS, Learning and Admin) Policy – Environments, Layouts, Activities and Groupings

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor and/or educators will:

Environment

  • include natural elements like plants, trees, gardens, rock, mud and water
  • include elements that challenge children and encourage appropriate risk taking
  • include specific requirements for special needs children
  • include sustainable practices
  • provide adequate shade, fencing, lighting, ventilation, heating and cooling

Layout

  • ensure children, educators and visitors can move around without disrupting children’s activities
  • create spaces which encourage collaborative learning
  • create areas where children can engage in quiet, restful or independent activities
  • ensure children can be adequately supervised at all times
  • keep a record of changes made to spaces and environments to create inviting learning spaces

Activities

  • complete regular risk assessments and implement practices to reduce or eliminate risk
  • engage children in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor experiences
  • discuss safety issues with children and involve them in setting rules
  • provide families with current safety information

Children’s Groupings

  • ensure the size and composition of groups allows children to develop secure relationships with educators and positive relationships with other children.

Room/Group Leader

  1. Set a goal for the week.
    Goal doesn’t always need to link to NQS Element. A goal can be used to solve a challenge or be positive improvement i.e. learning area setup
    Click here for goal template.
  2. Identify barriers
  3. Track the goal daily
  4. Celebrate achieved goal.

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for children to engage in social or solitary play according to their individual needs and preferences?
  2. Do you change or adapt resources where required to ensure each child can successfully participate?
  3. Do you help organise indoor and outdoor spaces where children can play or relax on their own or in a small group without interruption eg by adults or other children moving through the area?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

Regulation 113 Outdoor Environment

Who has to do what?

Educators must provide children with opportunities to explore natural settings and resources in outside play areas eg gardens, sandpits, dirt patches, pebble/gravel pits, edible plants, shady trees, worm farms, compost areas, water play areas, logs, rocks, hay bales, tree stumps and potted plants.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would families/children agree you monitor noise levels and implement strategies to reduce noise if needed?
  • Would families/children agree you always support activities started by or suggested by children?
  • Would families agree the indoor and outdoor environments look attractive?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha laughed and said she’d heard stories like this from other families and she thought it was just luck whether you got an ‘easy’ child or a child with more challenging behaviour.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 3.2.1 on pages 192-194 of the NQS Guide.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 200-201.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources as needed during the day to create a flexible and inclusive space where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Physical Environment (WHS, Learning and Admin) Policy – Environments, Layouts, Activities and Groupings

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor and/or educators will:

Environment

  • include natural elements like plants, trees, gardens, rock, mud and water
  • include elements that challenge children and encourage appropriate risk taking
  • include specific requirements for special needs children
  • include sustainable practices
  • provide adequate shade, fencing, lighting, ventilation, heating and cooling

Layout

  • ensure children, educators and visitors can move around without disrupting children’s activities
  • create spaces which encourage collaborative learning
  • create areas where children can engage in quiet, restful or independent activities
  • ensure children can be adequately supervised at all times
  • keep a record of changes made to spaces and environments to create inviting learning spaces

Activities

  • complete regular risk assessments and implement practices to reduce or eliminate risk
  • engage children in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor experiences
  • discuss safety issues with children and involve them in setting rules
  • provide families with current safety information

Children’s Groupings

  • ensure the size and composition of groups allows children to develop secure relationships with educators and positive relationships with other children.

Educational Leader

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for children to engage in social or solitary play according to their individual needs and preferences?
  2. Do you change or adapt resources where required to ensure each child can successfully participate?
  3. Do you help organise indoor and outdoor spaces where children can play or relax on their own or in a small group without interruption eg by adults or other children moving through the area?

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would families/children agree you monitor noise levels and implement strategies to reduce noise if needed?
  • Would families/children agree you always support activities started by or suggested by children?
  • Would families agree the indoor and outdoor environments look attractive?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha laughed and said she’d heard stories like this from other families and she thought it was just luck whether you got an ‘easy’ child or a child with more challenging behaviour.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 3.2.1 on pages 192-194 of the NQS Guide.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 200-201.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources as needed during the day to create a flexible and inclusive space where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Nominated Supervisor

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would families/children agree you monitor noise levels and implement strategies to reduce noise if needed?
  • Would families/children agree you always support activities started by or suggested by children?
  • Would families agree the indoor and outdoor environments look attractive?

Your team crave feedback on their weekly Centre Support professional development.

Getting appropriate feedback and seeing actions which come from their comments and reflections inspires them to keep on completing the professional development. It’s important therefore that you read the Educators’ section and make sure you and/or the Educational Leader:

  • action the checklist results eg if educators ask for help by answering ‘T’ they get the help they need
  • follow up their critical reflection ie help implement outcomes
  • use their QIP contributions and celebrate them with your educators

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha laughed and said she’d heard stories like this from other families and she thought it was just luck whether you got an ‘easy’ child or a child with more challenging behaviour.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 3.2.1 on pages 192-194 of the NQS Guide.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 200-201.

One mum said to Miss Tenisha that she couldn’t believe how different her children were. One seemed to be always happy and loved playing with other kids, and the other was very emotional and easily upset. How could this be when they were both raised in the same household in the same way? What should she be doing? Miss Tenisha explained that children are born with different temperaments and educators consider this when they’re planning room/group routines and learning experiences. For example, some children need to move around a lot more than other children and educators set up spaces and resources as needed during the day to create a flexible and inclusive space where they can engage in lots of things like running, jumping, playing with balls, dancing etc. Miss Tenisha explained the children preferred outdoor spaces and loved engaging in risky play activities.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.