4.2.1 Professional collaboration. Management, educators and staff work with mutual respect and collaboratively, and challenge and learn from each other, recognising each other’s strengths and skills.

Click on the button below that best describes you and follow the simple steps. Complete each step as it will automatically write your QIP and Self Assessment Tool.

Educators

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

1. Do you know the particular strengths of team members and use them when you can?
2. Are you open to receiving coaching/guidance about better ways of doing things or recognised best practice no matter how long you have been working in a Service or sector?
3. Do you share your knowledge and skills with team members, including those based on current recognised approaches and research and information gained from professional development?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

There are no specific Regulations for Element 4.2.1 Professional Collaboration.

We ‘ve listed some sources which may provide opportunities for you to share knowledge an understanding with team members:

  • Staying Healthy
  • Kidsafe
  • Rednose
  • Government Guidelines/Departments including those relating to healthy eating and physical activity, immunisation and employment relations eg Australia’s 24-Hour Movement Guidelines, Australian Dietary Guidelines
  • Inclusion Support Providers
  • EYLF/MTOP Guides
  • Theorists eg Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner, Nicholson, Brunner, Gardner, Bloom, Skinner
  • Academic journals/articles
  • Conferences/seminars/webinars
  • Training courses

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would team members agree you promptly and Would team members agree you’re always professional and respectful when sharing your knowledge or skills?
  • Would team members agree you’re open to learning better ways of doing things?
  • Would team members agree you promptly and willingly help team members who need some extra assistance?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.”


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.1 on pages 217-219 of the NQS Guide

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says:  

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family

the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom.  There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home (see article dated .


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says:

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family
  • the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom. There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home.

Miss Anna thanked Miss Amal for sharing the information, but respectfully suggested they refer families to some Government backed information. “Well let’s look at the State and Federal Health Department websites” Miss Amal suggested.  “Oh look, NSW Health advises parents for example to follow the Raising Children Network Coronavirus COVID 19 Family Guide which advises them to phone the Health Information Line 1800 020 080 for advice about isolating and testing. Let’s make this available to families.”

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Code of Conduct (Educator and Management Policy)Ethical conduct principles:

  • Commitment to our philosophy and values
  • Effective, open and respectful two-way communication
  • Honesty and integrity
  • Consistency and reliability
  • Safe and healthy workplace for employees, volunteers, children and families
  • Equal Opportunity workplace and culture

Managers, employees and volunteers will:

  • carry work out efficiently, economically and effectively
  • act honestly and with diligence
  • make decisions or take actions fairly, ethically, consistently
  • comply with our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
  • report (suspected) breaches of the Code
  • include children and families in the decision making process
  • implement age appropriate, culturally sensitive and inclusive activities/experiences
  • comply with all service policies and procedures

 Managers, employees and volunteers will not:

  • engage in unethical or unprofessional conduct
  • bully, harass, discriminate against, victimise, humiliate, intimidate or threatens others
  • use abusive, derogatory or offensive language
  • seek or accept a bribe or accept gifts/cash above a specified value
  • use any service property without authorisation
  • approach other employees or visitors on matters that don’t concern them
  • drink alcohol or use illicit substances on Service premises or work under their influence
  • smoke on the premises including in the car park
  • favour any child or develop close personal relationships with children outside work

 Families, visitors and children will:

  • respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person at Service
  • respect the decisions of educators and staff
  • co-operate and follow classroom rules
  • listen to educators’ instructions and follow them
  • raise any concerns with an educator or the Nominated Supervisor

 Families and visitors will not:

  • drink alcohol or use illicit substances on Service premises or enter the premises under their influence
  • smoke on the service premises including in the car park
  • have physical contact with children that are not their own unless a staff member is present
  • bully, harass or discriminate against any child or adult at the Service.

Room/Group Leader

  1. Set a goal for the week.
    Goal doesn’t always need to link to NQS Element. A goal can be used to solve a challenge or be positive improvement i.e. learning area setup
    Click here for goal template.
  2. Identify barriers
  3. Track the goal daily
  4. Celebrate achieved goal.

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you know the particular strengths of team members and use them when you can?
  2. Are you open to receiving coaching/guidance about better ways of doing things or recognised best practice no matter how long you have been working in a Service or sector?
  3. Do you share your knowledge and skills with team members, including those based on current recognised approaches and research and information gained from professional development?

There are no specific Regulations for Element 4.2.1 Professional Collaboration.

We ‘ve listed some sources which may provide opportunities for you to share knowledge an understanding with team members:

  • Staying Healthy
  • Kidsafe
  • Rednose
  • Government Guidelines/Departments including those relating to healthy eating and physical activity, immunisation and employment relations eg Australia’s 24-Hour Movement Guidelines, Australian Dietary Guidelines
  • Inclusion Support Providers
  • EYLF/MTOP Guides
  • Theorists eg Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner, Nicholson, Brunner, Gardner, Bloom, Skinner
  • Academic journals/articles
  • Conferences/seminars/webinars
  • Training courses

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would team members agree you’re always professional and respectful when sharing your knowledge or skills?
  • Would team members agree you’re open to learning better ways of doing things?
  • Would team members agree you promptly and willingly help team members who need some extra assistance?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.”


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.1on pages 217-219 of the NQS Guide

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says:

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family

the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom.  There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home (see article dated .


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says: 

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family
  • the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom. There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home.

Miss Anna thanked Miss Amal for sharing the information, but respectfully suggested they refer families to some Government backed information. “Well let’s look at the State and Federal Health Department websites” Miss Amal suggested.  “Oh look, NSW Health advises parents for example to follow the Raising Children Network Coronavirus COVID 19 Family Guide which advises them to phone the Health Information Line 1800 020 080 for advice about isolating and testing. Let’s make this available to families.”

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Code of Conduct (Educator and Management Policy)Ethical conduct principles:

  • Commitment to our philosophy and values
  • Effective, open and respectful two-way communication
  • Honesty and integrity
  • Consistency and reliability
  • Safe and healthy workplace for employees, volunteers, children and families
  • Equal Opportunity workplace and culture

Managers, employees and volunteers will:

  • carry work out efficiently, economically and effectively
  • act honestly and with diligence
  • make decisions or take actions fairly, ethically, consistently
  • comply with our Privacy and Confidentiality Policy
  • report (suspected) breaches of the Code
  • include children and families in the decision making process
  • implement age appropriate, culturally sensitive and inclusive activities/experiences
  • comply with all service policies and procedures

 Managers, employees and volunteers will not:

  • engage in unethical or unprofessional conduct
  • bully, harass, discriminate against, victimise, humiliate, intimidate or threatens others
  • use abusive, derogatory or offensive language
  • seek or accept a bribe or accept gifts/cash above a specified value
  • use any service property without authorisation
  • approach other employees or visitors on matters that don’t concern them
  • drink alcohol or use illicit substances on Service premises or work under their influence
  • smoke on the premises including in the car park
  • favour any child or develop close personal relationships with children outside work

 Families, visitors and children will:

  • respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person at Service
  • respect the decisions of educators and staff
  • co-operate and follow classroom rules
  • listen to educators’ instructions and follow them
  • raise any concerns with an educator or the Nominated Supervisor

 Families and visitors will not:

  • drink alcohol or use illicit substances on Service premises or enter the premises under their influence
  • smoke on the service premises including in the car park
  • have physical contact with children that are not their own unless a staff member is present
  • bully, harass or discriminate against any child or adult at the Service.

Educational Leader

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you know the particular strengths of team members and use them when you can?
  2. Are you open to receiving coaching/guidance about better ways of doing things or recognised best practice no matter how long you have been working in a Service or sector?
  3. Do you share your knowledge and skills with team members, including those based on current recognised approaches and research and information gained from professional development?

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would team members agree you’re always professional and respectful when sharing your knowledge or skills?
  • Would team members agree you’re open to learning better ways of doing things?
  • Would team members agree you promptly and willingly help team members who need some extra assistance?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.”


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.1on pages 217-219 of the NQS Guide

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says:  

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family

the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom.  There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home (see article dated .


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says: 

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family
  • the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom. There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home.

Miss Anna thanked Miss Amal for sharing the information, but respectfully suggested they refer families to some Government backed information. “Well let’s look at the State and Federal Health Department websites” Miss Amal suggested.  “Oh look, NSW Health advises parents for example to follow the Raising Children Network Coronavirus COVID 19 Family Guide which advises them to phone the Health Information Line 1800 020 080 for advice about isolating and testing. Let’s make this available to families.”

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Nominated Supervisor

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would team members agree you’re always professional and respectful when sharing your knowledge or skills?
  • Would team members agree you’re open to learning better ways of doing things?
  • Would team members agree you promptly and willingly help team members who need some extra assistance?

Your team crave feedback on their weekly Centre Support professional development.

Getting appropriate feedback and seeing actions which come from their comments and reflections inspires them to keep on completing the professional development. It’s important therefore that you read the Educators’ section and make sure you and/or the Educational Leader:

  • action the checklist results eg if educators ask for help by answering ‘T’ they get the help they need
  • follow up their critical reflection ie help implement outcomes
  • use their QIP contributions and celebrate them with your educators

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.”


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 4.2.1on pages 217-219 of the NQS Guide

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says:  

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family

the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom.  There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home (see article dated .


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 222-223.

Miss Anna said “It’s so hard talking to parents about excluding their child if they have a sniffle or cough. I mean Staying Healthy says you don’t have to exclude children if they have a cold and there we are telling parents they need to get their child tested for COVID-19. I’m so confused. I wish there was more specific guidance on this.” There was a recent article by ABC Life said Miss Amal. Here I’ll show you. See it says: 

  • colds and COVID-19 share a lot of the same symptoms and only a lab test can spot the difference
  • experts are urging people to get the test and not self-diagnose
  • even though children are at low risk of getting COVID, or getting seriously ill when they do get it, taking them for a test every time they have the mildest of symptoms is actually about contact tracing back to their parents and stopping it spread from the family
  • the Chair of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners says every symptom even a runny nose warrants a test being done because it’s the only way to stamp out the virus and sometimes a runny nose is the only symptom. There are some who disagree eg  a specialist at Perth Children’s Hospital says it’s okay not to test children if they just have a runny nose, but even she says these children need to stay home.

Miss Anna thanked Miss Amal for sharing the information, but respectfully suggested they refer families to some Government backed information. “Well let’s look at the State and Federal Health Department websites” Miss Amal suggested.  “Oh look, NSW Health advises parents for example to follow the Raising Children Network Coronavirus COVID 19 Family Guide which advises them to phone the Health Information Line 1800 020 080 for advice about isolating and testing. Let’s make this available to families.”

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.