Element 5.2.1

Element 5.2.1 Collaborative learning – Children are supported to collaborate, learn from and help each other.

Click on the button below that best describes you and follow the simple steps. Complete each step as it will automatically write your QIP and Self Assessment Tool.

Educators

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for all children to lead group activities?
  2. Do you provide opportunities for children of mixed ages and genders to engage in safe group activities?
  3. Do you make spaces and provide materials to encourage interaction and cooperation?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

As there are no specific Regulations covering Element 5.2.1, let’s look at how this element fits with the learning frameworks which are based on the relationships children have with other children, educators, and their family and community members.

NQF Guide What Element 5.2.1 aims to achieve EYLF
“Services provide a range of opportunities for children to learn how to work with others collaboratively and effectively, including through play experiences.” Learning Outcome: a skill, knowledge or disposition that educators can actively promote in early childhood settings, in collaboration with children and families.
“Educators can support children to learn about and experience cooperation by modelling cooperative behaviour themselves and acknowledging cooperation when it occurs.

By nurturing respectful and reciprocal relationships among children, educators support children to value collaboration and teamwork.”

Principle Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships

Educators also help children to learn about their responsibilities to others, to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners, and to value collaboration and teamwork.

“As children develop their social skills, educators provide time and space for children to engage in collaborative experiences. These enjoyable experiences help children to learn about their responsibilities to others and to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners.” Outcome 2.1 Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Educators model language that children can use to express ideas, negotiate roles and collaborate to achieve goals

Outcome 4.1 Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

Educators encourage children to engage in both individual and collaborative explorative learning processes

Outcome 5.5 Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking

Educators encourage collaborative learning about and through technologies between children, and children and educators

“By encouraging children’s active involvement in learning experiences, children learn to explore and solve problems and develop greater capacity for independence and collaboration.” Practice Learning environments

Indoor and outdoor environments promote opportunities for sustained shared thinking and collaborative learning.

“Collaborative experiences help children to learn about their responsibilities to others and to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners.” Outcome 1.2 Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

Children increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others

Outcome 3.1 Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing

Children increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others

“Children learn to balance their own needs and wants with those of other children.” Outcome 2 Children are connected with and contribute to their world

When children participate collaboratively in everyday routines, events and experiences and have opportunities to contribute to decisions, they learn to live interdependently

“Older children can challenge and extend their own thinking, and that of others, and create new knowledge in collaborative interactions and negotiations with peers.” Outcome 4 Children are confident and involved learners

Children use processes such as exploration, collaboration and problem solving across all aspects of curriculum.

“By exchanging ideas and collaborating with others, older children can also learn life and social skills, such as conflict resolution and negotiation skills.” Outcome 4 Children are confident and involved learners

Children can challenge and extend their own thinking, and that of others, and create new knowledge in collaborative interactions and negotiations.

 

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would children and families say you always model the positive social interactions you teach children?
  • Would children and families agree you’ve set up spaces which encourage small group activities and interactions?
  • Would visitors to the service see small groups of children happily working together to achieve outcomes?
  • Would families agree their child has been offered the chance to be a leader?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

We wanted to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We got 3 quotes from local design/landscape businesses and picked the cheapest one.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 5.1.2 on pages 240-242 of the NQS Guide.

Preschool

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid. Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 246-247.

Preschool Room

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis (outdoor environment folder) and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid (displayed in room). Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.

This project used A. Clark’s (2010) participatory methods for children and adults to design and construct the environment. Many concept designs were generated and refined. Children evaluated the various designs demonstrating their agency, determining that a pyramid structure was the best design option. We then involved the children in the building process too, overcoming some educators’ views that this was too risky, especially given the structure’s height. When building the structure, the children collaboratively learnt how to conceptualise, design, plan and construct. There were numerous opportunities to promote learning that engaged mathematical concepts including counting, measuring, sequencing, depth, size and angles (see learning stories in weeks commencing 13/1/20). Families were pleased to see their children involved in ‘real work’ with a significant outcome. One parent said, “it’s about time they learnt real things” in relation to the building process.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Excursion Policy

Educators will:

  • complete a risk assessment before an excursion taking into account the risks listed in the policy. For regular outings risk assessment are required if one has not been conducted within the last 12 months of the excursion date. Regular outings are walks, drives or trips to places that we visit regularly and which always have the same risks
  • ensure the Excursion Authorisation Form in the policy is completed by parents before their child goes on the excursion. This authorisation only needs to be obtained once every 12 months for regular outings
  • complete the Excursion Checklist before any excursion
  • ensure transport arrangements are safe and meet policy guidelines
  • only undertake excursions that are consistent with the Service insurance cover.

Room/Group Leader

  1. Set a goal for the week.
    Goal doesn’t always need to link to NQS Element. A goal can be used to solve a challenge or be positive improvement i.e. learning area setup
    Click here for goal template.
  2. Identify barriers
  3. Track the goal daily
  4. Celebrate achieved goal.

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for all children to lead group activities?
  2. Do you provide opportunities for children of mixed ages and genders to engage in safe group activities?
  3. Do you make spaces and provide materials to encourage interaction and cooperation?

What Regulation goes with this NQS Element?

As there are no specific Regulations covering Element 5.2.1, let’s look at how this element fits with the learning frameworks which are based on the relationships children have with other children, educators, and their family and community members.

NQF Guide What Element 5.2.1 aims to achieve EYLF
“Services provide a range of opportunities for children to learn how to work with others collaboratively and effectively, including through play experiences.” Learning Outcome: a skill, knowledge or disposition that educators can actively promote in early childhood settings, in collaboration with children and families.
“Educators can support children to learn about and experience cooperation by modelling cooperative behaviour themselves and acknowledging cooperation when it occurs.

By nurturing respectful and reciprocal relationships among children, educators support children to value collaboration and teamwork.”

Principle Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships

Educators also help children to learn about their responsibilities to others, to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners, and to value collaboration and teamwork.

“As children develop their social skills, educators provide time and space for children to engage in collaborative experiences. These enjoyable experiences help children to learn about their responsibilities to others and to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners.” Outcome 2.1 Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Educators model language that children can use to express ideas, negotiate roles and collaborate to achieve goals

Outcome 4.1 Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

Educators encourage children to engage in both individual and collaborative explorative learning processes

Outcome 5.5 Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking

Educators encourage collaborative learning about and through technologies between children, and children and educators

“By encouraging children’s active involvement in learning experiences, children learn to explore and solve problems and develop greater capacity for independence and collaboration.” Practice Learning environments

Indoor and outdoor environments promote opportunities for sustained shared thinking and collaborative learning.

“Collaborative experiences help children to learn about their responsibilities to others and to appreciate their connectedness and interdependence as learners.” Outcome 1.2 Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

Children increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others

Outcome 3.1 Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing

Children increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others

“Children learn to balance their own needs and wants with those of other children.” Outcome 2 Children are connected with and contribute to their world

When children participate collaboratively in everyday routines, events and experiences and have opportunities to contribute to decisions, they learn to live interdependently

“Older children can challenge and extend their own thinking, and that of others, and create new knowledge in collaborative interactions and negotiations with peers.” Outcome 4 Children are confident and involved learners

Children use processes such as exploration, collaboration and problem solving across all aspects of curriculum.

“By exchanging ideas and collaborating with others, older children can also learn life and social skills, such as conflict resolution and negotiation skills.” Outcome 4 Children are confident and involved learners

Children can challenge and extend their own thinking, and that of others, and create new knowledge in collaborative interactions and negotiations.

 

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would children and families say you always model the positive social interactions you teach children?
  • Would children and families agree you’ve set up spaces which encourage small group activities and interactions?
  • Would visitors to the service see small groups of children happily working together to achieve outcomes?
  • Would families agree their child has been offered the chance to be a leader?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

We wanted to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We got 3 quotes from local design/landscape businesses and picked the cheapest one.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 5.1.2 on pages 240-242 of the NQS Guide.

Preschool

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid. Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 246-247.

Preschool Room

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis (outdoor environment folder) and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid (displayed in room). Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.

This project used A. Clark’s (2010) participatory methods for children and adults to design and construct the environment. Many concept designs were generated and refined. Children evaluated the various designs demonstrating their agency, determining that a pyramid structure was the best design option. We then involved the children in the building process too, overcoming some educators’ views that this was too risky, especially given the structure’s height. When building the structure, the children collaboratively learnt how to conceptualise, design, plan and construct. There were numerous opportunities to promote learning that engaged mathematical concepts including counting, measuring, sequencing, depth, size and angles (see learning stories in weeks commencing 13/1/20). Families were pleased to see their children involved in ‘real work’ with a significant outcome. One parent said, “it’s about time they learnt real things” in relation to the building process.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Excursion Policy

Educators will:

  • complete a risk assessment before an excursion taking into account the risks listed in the policy. For regular outings risk assessment are required if one has not been conducted within the last 12 months of the excursion date. Regular outings are walks, drives or trips to places that we visit regularly and which always have the same risks
  • ensure the Excursion Authorisation Form in the policy is completed by parents before their child goes on the excursion. This authorisation only needs to be obtained once every 12 months for regular outings
  • complete the Excursion Checklist before any excursion
  • ensure transport arrangements are safe and meet policy guidelines
  • only undertake excursions that are consistent with the Service insurance cover.

Educational Leader

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Together as a team, use what you do (from your brainstorming session and the checklist) to write 6 short sentence that show “how” you are doing it. We’ve chosen 3 questions from the checklist for you. Why are you doing this? QIP’s need to have personalised stories about your practice so the assessor can ask you about why and how you do things. The sentences below can be used for Friday’s QIP writing section.

  1. Do you provide opportunities for all children to lead group activities?
  2. Do you provide opportunities for children of mixed ages and genders to engage in safe group activities?
  3. Do you make spaces and provide materials to encourage interaction and cooperation?

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would children and families say you always model the positive social interactions you teach children?
  • Would children and families agree you’ve set up spaces which encourage small group activities and interactions?
  • Would visitors to the service see small groups of children happily working together to achieve outcomes?
  • Would families agree their child has been offered the chance to be a leader?

You have discovered where your practice is compared to the NQS Guide (comparing what you currently do and the checklist). This is the process of self-assessment. If you have discovered practices, processes, checklist areas you need to improve upon, write them below. This section will be copied into your QIP.

We wanted to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We got 3 quotes from local design/landscape businesses and picked the cheapest one.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 5.1.2 on pages 240-242 of the NQS Guide.

Preschool

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid. Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 246-247.

Preschool Room

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis (outdoor environment folder) and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid (displayed in room). Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.

This project used A. Clark’s (2010) participatory methods for children and adults to design and construct the environment. Many concept designs were generated and refined. Children evaluated the various designs demonstrating their agency, determining that a pyramid structure was the best design option. We then involved the children in the building process too, overcoming some educators’ views that this was too risky, especially given the structure’s height. When building the structure, the children collaboratively learnt how to conceptualise, design, plan and construct. There were numerous opportunities to promote learning that engaged mathematical concepts including counting, measuring, sequencing, depth, size and angles (see learning stories in weeks commencing 13/1/20). Families were pleased to see their children involved in ‘real work’ with a significant outcome. One parent said, “it’s about time they learnt real things” in relation to the building process.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.

Nominated Supervisor

The following is an example of a Code of Conduct. These types of codes must be negotiated and agreed upon by the service. Please review your Code of Conduct and compare with the one below. Change or add accordingly to your services needs and requirements.

The Approved Provider, Nominated Supervisor, educators, staff members, volunteers and students will uphold the following ethical conduct principles at all times, and promote positive interactions within the Service and the local community.

  1. Commitment to our Service philosophy and values, including the promotion of a meaningful connection to the NQF and best practice in early childhood education in partnership with our families
  2. Effective, open and respectful two-way communication and feedback between employees, children, families and management
  3. Honesty and integrity in all interactions between children, families, employees and managers
  4. Consistency and reliability in all exchanges with children, families, employees and managers
  5. Commitment to a workplace which values and promotes the safety, health and wellbeing of employees, volunteers, children and families.

Commitment to an Equal Opportunity workplace and culture which values the knowledge, experience and professionalism of all employees, team members and managers, and the diverse heritage of our families and children.

Why are you doing the checklist?

The practices identified in the checklist are what the assessor needs to see you do so they can check you’re ‘meeting the NQS.’ If you embed all the things in the checklist, then you are meeting the Element. If there’s something on the checklist that you’re not doing, then you need to either adjust your practice to do it, or ask for help and training to do what’s on the checklist ie work with your educational leader or room leader who should teach/coach you how to do it.

Step 1 Critical Reflection
The EYLF and MTOP say “Critical reflection involves closely examining all  aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives.” There is no checklist for critical reflection, it is all about other peoples perspectives.

Select one or more from below or from the checklist to critically reflect upon:

  • Would children and families say you always model the positive social interactions you teach children?
  • Would children and families agree you’ve set up spaces which encourage small group activities and interactions?
  • Would visitors to the service see small groups of children happily working together to achieve outcomes?
  • Would families agree their child has been offered the chance to be a leader?

Your team crave feedback on their weekly Centre Support professional development.

Getting appropriate feedback and seeing actions which come from their comments and reflections inspires them to keep on completing the professional development. It’s important therefore that you read the Educators’ section and make sure you and/or the Educational Leader:

  • action the checklist results eg if educators ask for help by answering ‘T’ they get the help they need
  • follow up their critical reflection ie help implement outcomes
  • use their QIP contributions and celebrate them with your educators.

We wanted to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We got 3 quotes from local design/landscape businesses and picked the cheapest one.


The green text is directly related to the meeting indicators for Element 5.1.2 on pages 240-242 of the NQS Guide.

Preschool

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid. Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.


Below is a case study that demonstrates how the Exceeding themes 1 Embedded Practice, 2 Critical Reflection and 3 Meaningful engagement with families and communities link into practice. The blue text is based on or directly quotes the exceeding indicators in the NQS Guide pages 246-247.

Preschool Room

After asking children’s views, and reflecting together as a team, we decided to introduce a climbing frame into our outdoor play area. We looked at our families’ skills, and worked with them in the design and build of the frame. Families also donated the tools required. With guidance from room leader Cherie, the children developed the risk benefit analysis (outdoor environment folder) and then the rules children needed to follow when using the pyramid (displayed in room). Showing leadership, they also taught the three year olds who shared the learning space these rules. For example, no more than two children can climb the structure at any time.

This project used A. Clark’s (2010) participatory methods for children and adults to design and construct the environment. Many concept designs were generated and refined. Children evaluated the various designs demonstrating their agency, determining that a pyramid structure was the best design option. We then involved the children in the building process too, overcoming some educators’ views that this was too risky, especially given the structure’s height. When building the structure, the children collaboratively learnt how to conceptualise, design, plan and construct. There were numerous opportunities to promote learning that engaged mathematical concepts including counting, measuring, sequencing, depth, size and angles (see learning stories in weeks commencing 13/1/20). Families were pleased to see their children involved in ‘real work’ with a significant outcome. One parent said, “it’s about time they learnt real things” in relation to the building process.

Use the below points to analyse your above exceeding example to see if you have included everything.

1. Write the room location into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows where to look for your strengths.
2. Write the educator’s name into the strength. This will ensure the assessor knows who to ask about your strengths.
3. Include the child/children’s names in your strength. This will give educators confidence to talk about a subject they know about (the child/ren).
4. Evidence eg learning story, photo that’s easy to access.
5. Write how you are achieving the exceeding themes.
Embedded Practice
Critical Reflection
Engagement with families/community
6. Tell the assessor exactly where to find the location of other evidence they need to see to show how you’re exceeding.
7. Show the assessor the location and time of other practice they need to observe to show how you’re exceeding.