1.2.2 Responsive teaching and scaffolding

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Educators respond to children’s ideas and play and extend children’s learning through open-ended questions, interactions and feedback.

Go through the checklist and be honest so your Educational Leader and Nominated Supervisor know how to help you be the best.

E = Embedded, yes, I do that ALL the time.
K = We know we need to do that, but we don’t do
it all the time.
T = Please teach me how to do it or improve my understanding of why we need to do it.

Teaching Practices Edu 1
Do you let children lead the development of the curriculum?
Are you flexible in planning the curriculum ie don’t plan weeks or months in advance or have pre-determined themes?
Do you follow children’s learning preferences eg don’t force children to be involved in groups or activities (like formal structured group times) that don’t interest them
Are you flexible when it comes to routines where possible, giving children long periods of unhurried time?
Do you use intentional teaching practices whenever opportunities arise, including during routines, not just at set times like group time?
Do you reflect critically on activities, children’s learning and your teaching practices, looking at events from the viewpoint of children, families, colleagues and the community?
Do you change your practices as a result of your critical reflections?
Do you have conversations with children of all ages to affirm their identity and their place in their community?
Do you promote activities which encourage children to interact and learn for each other?
Do you identify what each child knows, can do and understands?
Do you extend each child’s learning based on what they know, can do and understand?
Does your documentation clearly show what children know and what you have done to extend learning?
Can families understand the documentation?
Do you participate in children’s imaginary play while allowing children to direct the drama?
Do you act on opportunities to have sustained interactions and conversations with a child or children eg while changing nappies, during meals, during play?
Do you base learning around relationships that you have with children, and that they have with their families and community, rather than relying on resources and equipment?
Do you actively seek to find out more about children’s everyday lives eg through conversations with their families?
Do you use information gained about children from their families and enrolment information to plan the Curriculum?
Do you include room routines as opportunities for learning?
Do you make sure your own beliefs and values about what children can do don’t limit their learning opportunities?

Case Study – Farm Animal Wall
Karen placed different farm animals on the wall before inviting the children over to explore relationships with living things. “These animals live on a farm” Karen explained. As the children pointed to the different animals Karen named them. “This is a sheep, dog, a pig, a cow, a horse, a chicken and a duck”. The children watched and listened as Karen continued to discuss the different features and colours of the animals. “There is a pink pig, a black and white cow and dog, a white duck and sheep, a brown chicken.

Karen modelled language and encouraged the children to express themselves through their own interpretation of language by pointing to the animals and making the sounds of each animal. “A cow goes moo, a dog goes woof, a sheep goes baa.” Karen repeated the sounds, so the children become familiar with which sound belonged to each animal.  cow and dog, a white duck and sheep, a brown chicken.
Karen modelled language and encouraged the children to express themselves through their own interpretation of language by pointing to the animals and making the sounds of each animal. “A cow goes moo, a dog goes woof, a sheep goes baa.” Karen repeated the sound’s, so the children become familiar with which sound belonged to each animal.
Learning Outcomes 2.4 & 5.1
Karen

Measurement

Continuing from yesterday, we discussed other forms of measurement. We used a tape measure to see the length of the table then we measured the width. Cherie told Jadzia, Churchill, Ivy, Eva, Zayne and Havana we would need to know these measurements if we were making or buying a tablecloth. Cherie said the size of the object we are measuring determines if we use a ruler or a tape measure. Zayne got a dinosaur to measure. Cherie questioned with, “Should we measure it with the small ruler or the long retractable tape measure?” Zayne said, “this ruler.” Jadzia loudly declared “No, this one,” handing the tape measure to Zayne. Ivy collected a skirting board that was in the room and Cherie asked what we should measure it with. Ivy picked the long retractable tape measure and stretched it out with the help of Nella. Cherie demonstrated how we look at the end of the object and notice what number it is next too. Cherie said each unit of length is given a number. Ivy softly replied “1,2 and 3. It’s 2.” Cherie recognised mathematical understandings that children bring to learning and builds on these in ways that are relevant to each child. Cherie praised Ivy’s knowledge and responded the units go up like counting. Ivy applies her mathematical knowledge to daily activities and makes predictions. LO 4.2 The children learnt how to stretch out a tape measure and know that units of measurement go up like counting. Eva stretched out the tape measure to the length of the dinosaur and looked up at Cherie saying “Five.”

Case Study –

Educator Jane was trying to run a group time and became very frustrated when the children jumped up and ran over to the window in their classroom as a huge truck with a digger appeared in the centre’s car park. Jane asked her team member for assistance by bringing the children back to the mat, so she could finish the book. Behaviour problems followed.

Exceeding Theme Core

All educators consistently and respectfully respond to each child’s ideas and play, for example through open-ended questions and feedback, to extend each child’s participation, learning and development. All educators consistently draw on families’ or communities’ understanding of each child’s strengths, ideas, culture and interests to extend their learning and development, and regularly reflect, individually and with each other, on their educational practice.

Where is your practice compared to the above statement?

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