How do you know if you are doing a good job?

[ms-user]

How do you know if you are doing a good job?

4.2.1, 4.2.2, 6.1.2

We need to open a space and time to allow our team to communicate. Firstly you are going to discover what your educators think of your room leading skills. Secondly you are going to give feedback to your educators regarding their skills and plan for them to improve.
Room Leader: Ask the following question of each educator in your team.
Do you feel I have coached you to develop partnerships with families eg so you feel confident to share information with them about their child’s learning, to take parents to the curriculum wall and discuss activities, to encourage parents to share information about their child, home routines, daily lives and weekends to create curriculum?

Educator’s Names strongly agree agree neutral disagree strongly disagree Educator’s comments
Courtney I get very nervous

Educators: Ask the following question of your Room Leader.
After I greet parents, do you feel I have good conversations with them about things like their jobs or hobbies, how their day’s been, what their child learnt, who they played with, their child’s activities and interests outside the service, what’s happening at the family home?

Educator’s Names strongly agree agree neutral disagree strongly disagree Room Leader’s comments

[/ms-user]

What is coaching?

[ms-user]

Coaching

I often hear people say ‘they’ don’t know what ‘they’ are doing and ‘they’ have no common sense. However, what I usually see is a lack of experienced educators teaching less experienced educators.  So I’d like to work with you on the process of coaching.
What is coaching?
Coaching can be used to develop people’s skills, improve their performance, explore goals and correct inappropriate conduct. It typically takes place as a conversation between two people and focuses on an agreed goal. The coach then helps the other person to learn new things themselves rather than having new ways imposed on them. This approach is more likely to provide a lasting result.
How do I coach someone? 
The GROW model – think about

  1. GOAL – what you want to achieve
  2. REALITY – what’s happening now
  3. OPTIONS – what you could do –
  4. WAY FORWARD – what you’ll do

Practical Example
Mandy’s been a trainee for 6 months. She’s a hard worker, studying well and is forming great relationships with the children and team members. Her portfolios and programming are coming along nicely – but some families have said they’re not happy with her communication.

  1. GOAL

Mandy and her Room Leader Tracy discuss the family feedback. They agree Mandy needs to become more confident communicating with families and set a timeframe of 4 weeks.

  1. REALITY

Tracy and Mandy discuss:

  • how Mandy feels when a parent approaches her
  • what Mandy thinks her role is in building strong partnerships with families
  • her understanding of service policies and procedures on communication
  1. OPTIONS

Tracy and Mandy brainstorm ideas and develop a plan involving:

  • training in relevant policies and procedures
  • Mandy to stand with Tracy while Tracy models appropriate communication with families
  • Tracy to support Mandy while Mandy speaks with families and then provide constructive feedback
  1. WAY FORWARD

Nominated Supervisor speaks to parents after 4 weeks. They acknowledge a marked improvement in Mandy’s confidence, saying she now talks with them about their child’s learning. Nominated Supervisor implements a regular parent feedback tool to monitor all educators’ communication.
Mandy now has aspirations to be a Room Leader one day and continues to grow in confidence.

Tracy has added communication with families to all weekly meeting agendas to maintain the focus on communication.

Coaching plan in action

Coaching can be used to develop people’s skills, improve their performance, explore goals and correct inappropriate conduct. It typically takes place as a conversation between two people and focuses on an agreed goal. The coach then helps the other person to learn new things themselves rather than having new ways imposed on them. This approach is more likely to provide a lasting result.

How do I coach someone? 

GROW model steps Write out your steps to meet your selected goals
1.GOAL  – what you want to achieve
2.REALITY – what’s happening now
3.OPTIONS  – what you could do –
4.WAY FORWARD  – what you’ll do

[/ms-user]

How to identify goals to work on – Goal template

[ms-user]

Identifying and working to achieve goals is a simple way to help people improve.

The following goals are examples and not an exhaustive list. We suggest you develop goals based on the issues or problems you’re having in your room/service.

Relationships with Children

1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.2.3, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 5.1.1, 5.1.2, 5.2.2, 6.1.2, 6.2.1

  • Show children by our actions they can trust us and that we’re always there for them
  • Improve the quality and amount of information on children and families we share with team members
  • Increase our expectations for all children and consistently encourage them
  • Reflect on whether we’re really including each child’s interests in the curriculum
  • Look for the reasons children act inappropriately and never blame the child
  • Change teaching practices to work with each child’s strengths and preferred learning styles
  • Include children in setting rules for the room and outdoor play area
  • Focus more on teaching children about emotions and feelings
  • Increase interactions with children who are quieter and less outgoing than other children
  • Include more activities which are based on children’s cultures and heritage
  • Implement home visit program for new and current children

Relationships with Families

6.1.1. 6.1.2, 6.1.3, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.3

  • Learn to confidently talk to all parents at drop off and pick up times
  • Learn all parents’ names
  • Improve the quality and amount of information on children and families we share with team members
  • Provide more interesting information about each child’s day and learning with their family
  • Encourage families to share relevant information by discussing child’s daily routines at service, interests, achievements etc
  • Increase level of family input and showcase it in our curriculum
  • Advise all families about our complaints procedure and who to contact
  • Discuss available inclusion support at next staff meeting
  • Educational Leader to discuss access to inclusion support with relevant families
  • Clean up parent library so it’s attractive and has current information on parenting and community organisations
  • Invite families to an evening sausage sizzle once every quarter
  • Implement a Facebook Page open to service families only
  • Review our orientation procedure for families and children to make sure everything covered

Relationships with Community

6.2.2, 6.2.3

  • Choose several community organisations to develop connections with eg organisations which children or families attend, cultural groups or relevant businesses
  • Learn more about local support services and organisations

Safety

2.1.2, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3

  • Properly implement a risk management process – identify, assess, remove/ minimise, monitor
  • Always assess risk of new equipment and activities before involving children
  • Teach children how to safely use equipment and complete activities
  • Learn to immediately remove or reduce an identified risk
  • Understand what effective supervision requires eg constantly supervise children when included in ratios – no phones etc
  • Always tell team members if moving locations or temporarily leaving the room
  • Be able to confidently discuss children’s medical managements and risk minimisation plans
  • Practise our emergency evacuation procedures more often to increase confidence of children and staff
  • Practise all identified emergencies eg lockdowns

Child Protection

2.2.3

  • Learn to confidently identify the indicators of abuse and neglect
  • Ensure everyone’s aware of service visitors and never leave children alone with them
  • Be aware of what team members are doing and take action if they take children into secluded areas
  • Learn how to report abuse or neglect
  • Ensure educators always speak appropriately in front of children

Sustainability

3.2.3

  • Include more practices which protect and respect the environment in service operations
  • Include more learning and activities about environmental issues and practices in our curriculum
  • Ask families for clean milk containers and get children involved in planting herbs etc in them

Professional Interactions

4.2.1, 4.2.2

  • Learn to recognise and use the unique skills and knowledge all team members bring
  • Improve understanding of professional interactions eg appearance, respect, interactions, privacy
  • Look for solutions to staffing issues, room routines, cleaning duties etc
  • Speak directly with a team member about issues of concern and tell them how you feel/why this is a problem for you
  • Learn to confidently implement the complaints procedure if there’s still an issue after talking with the person
  • Learn to confidently share knowledge and ideas about teaching practice

Teamwork

4.1.1, 4.2.1, 4.2.2

  • Improve the level of support and encouragement provided to team members
  • Get all team members to understand that it is everyone’s job to clean and comfort and care for children
  • Improve the level of communication between team members so we all know what’s happening and who may need help
  • Have regular 5-10 minute team meetings

Collaborative learning

1.1.1, 1.1.3, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 5.2.1

  • Increase opportunities for children to share ideas and knowledge
  • Be confident to research issues that I don’t know anything about and learn with the children
  • Rearrange the outdoor spaces so children can engage in small, uninterrupted group play
  • Collect lots of natural resources for loose parts play and bring inside the room

Intentional Teaching

1.2.1, 1.2.2

  • Become more aware of opportunities for intentional teaching eg as they emerge from daily activities and experiences
  • Educational Leader to highlight cases from previous week’s curriculum/documentation showing educators how they could have implemented intentional teaching

Extending learning

1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.2.1, 1.2.2,

  • Look for opportunities to extend learning that can go on for days or even weeks
  • Learn to extend learning without relying on equipment eg use children’s relationships and connections with community
  • Educational Leader to highlight cases from previous week’s curriculum/documentation showing educators how they could have extended learning

Physical Activity

1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.2.1, 2.1.3, 6.1.3

  • Increase the amount of physical activity included in the daily curriculum
  • Learn to recognise the physical activity that is included in daily activities eg cleaning, getting resources, emptying compost
  • Implement new activities eg yoga, dance, ball skills
  • Reduce the amount of time children spend watching TV, YouTube etc at the service
  • Increase the amount of physical activity which offers challenges to children eg climbing trees

Healthy eating

1.1.1, 1.1.3, 1.2.1, 2.1.3, 6.1.3

  • Only eat healthy food in front of children
  • Talk about healthy food more with children eg what makes it healthy, how to cook eat, how it tastes, how to grow it
  • Improve our service veggie garden
  • Implement more cooking activities with children
  • Learn more about the Australian Dietary Guidelines/Infant Feeding Guidelines
  • Review our menu against the Australian Dietary Guidelines/Infant Feeding Guidelines
  • Provide more information to families about healthy eating eg simple and quick recipes, info on salt/sugar

Hygiene

1.1.3, 1.2.1, 2.1.2, 3.1.2, 6.1.3

  • Improve our knowledge about infection control procedures
  • Learn to always implement infection control procedures
  • Teach children cough, sneeze, nose blowing etiquette
  • Learn when we should be wearing gloves
  • Learn to reduce incidences of cross contamination
  • Learn how to store perishable food properly
  • Learn how long perishable food can be kept at room temperature
  • Increase the number of times the bathroom/toilet is cleaned daily
  • Make sure the room is clean and tidy at the end of every day
  • Develop or improve our cleaning schedules
  • Learn to confidently refuse entry to children who are ill or may have an infectious disease

Physical environment

2.2.1, 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3

  • Display a supervision plan ie where educators must stand in the outside play area
  • Sand the wooden cubby house to remove all splinters of wood
  • Ensure all educators know how to clean and maintain the sandpit,
  • Replace sliding door so children can move more easily from indoor to outdoor environment
  • Implement progressive morning teas which allow children to move freely around environment and activities
  • Design a dry creek bed for outdoor area

Learning Documentation

1.3.1, 1.3.2, 1.3.3, 7.2.2

  • Learn to write less but make it more meaningful
  • Learn not to repeat what’s in a photo
  • Learn how to document progress or achievement of learning outcomes
  • Keep portfolios up to date so there is no mad rush at the end of the year
  • Involve children in completing their learning documentation
  • Keep a current record of children’s progress against the learning outcomes
  • Improve the way we display our learning documentation to encourage family involvement

Business Practices

7.1.1, 7.1.2, 7.1.3, 7.2.1, 7.2.2, 7.2.3

  • Improve our recruitment and induction practices
  • Hold monthly staff meetings for all service staff
  • Invite all staff members to contribute to staff meeting agenda
  • Complete annual professional development appraisals with training plans
  • All staff members can calculate ratio requirements for children at service
  • Improve management systems to ensure staff always have appropriate qualifications and child protection clearances eg diary system and registers maintained
  • Work on Quality Improvement Plan every week
  • All staff contribute to Quality Improvement Plan
  • Progress notes are added to Quality Improvement Plan every week where relevant
  • Improve the security of personal information
  • Ensure that records which are archived for certain periods in line with the Regs are accessible and easy to identify
  • Ensure all staff members know what a serious incident is
  • Ensure all staff members know that complaints about a breach of the law or that the health or wellbeing of children is being compromised must be reported to the Department

Business Documentation

7.1.1, 7.1.2, 7.2.3

  • Look up those policies and procedures we’re not very familiar with
  • Use the ACECQA Guide to the Regulations to become more familiar with the Regulations
  • Use the Use the ACECQA Guide to the NQS to become more familiar with the NQS
  • Make it easier to access our policies and procedures, and the Regs/NQS
  • Develop an organisation chart which clearly shows who everyone reports to
  • Develop a new Statement of Philosophy which is based on our core values

Business Practices

7.1.1, 7.1.2, 7.1.3, 7.2.1, 7.2.2, 7.2.3

  • Improve our recruitment and induction practices
  • Hold monthly staff meetings for all service staff
  • Invite all staff members to contribute to staff meeting agenda
  • Complete annual professional development appraisals with training plans
  • All staff members can calculate ratio requirements for children at service
  • Improve management systems to ensure staff always have appropriate qualifications and child protection clearances eg diary system and registers maintained
  • Work on Quality Improvement Plan every week
  • All staff contribute to Quality Improvement Plan
  • Progress notes are added to Quality Improvement Plan every week where relevant
  • Improve the security of personal information
  • Ensure that records which are archived for certain periods in line with the Regs are accessible and easy to identify
  • Ensure all staff members know what a serious incident is
  • Ensure all staff members know that complaints about a breach of the law or that the health or wellbeing of children is being compromised must be reported to the Department

Reflection

1.3.2, 7.2.1

  • Learn to reflect on better ways to do things during daily activities
  • Learn to think about things as if I was a child, parent, colleague etc – how might I feel, what might I think?
  • Develop a mindset of continuous improvement – there’s always a better way to do things

Select two goals


[/ms-user]

What are your educators doing at any given time?

[ms-user]

The Story of Cinderellas

Cinderellas is a magical long day care service that had two incredible people working there together for the past 30 years. These two women were so in tune with each other few words were needed as they did this magical dance in the rooms and outdoors with each other. They knew exactly what to do to make a day flow. If one did a task, for example ran grouptime, the other set the room up for the next experience. This magical teamwork flowed because they both knew exactly what was needed when working with the children. When a little mishap occurred, which it always will with children, the flow continued with the issue easily resolved. Each educator could step in and do the other’s job when required – no asking or directing. They just knew what was required, could sense all problems and solve them before they even occurred. One time a child was doing something they weren’t supposed to. Facing the opposite direction the educator, without looking up from wiping the tables, redirected the child who was about to climb the bookshelf to a more appropriate area. The child looked amazed as the educator appeared to have eyes in the back of her head.

Managing Educators’ Time to achieve positive outcomes

Unfortunately, Cinderellas doesn’t exist in most services, especially with our high staff turnover.  Don’t panic – a proper run sheet for the room can make any service a Cinderellas. While a routine is a broad-brush stroke of the day, a run sheet breaks the routine down and assigns jobs to specific educators to ensure the routine is completed. Please note strict routines with exact times like this are not needed for everyone or every room. However, walking into a room where it is complete chaos because no educator knows what to do indicates the room requires a run sheet.

See below Emma’s run sheet that she needed to create for her room.

Time Main Activity Support Activity 1 Support Activity 2 Support Activity 3
6.30 Family grouping
8am Outdoor play, greet parents, get weekend sheetsWho: Emma H
9am Positive story for behaviour Who: Emma H Nappy change Who: Cherie
9.10am Helper chart Who: Emma
9.20am Progressive morning tea Who: Cherie – Welcome (Good morning)
– Who is here today activity
– What do you want to do today? A-frame plan with children
Emma H
Planned physical activity – outdoors
Who: Tayla
Set up for group time
Who: Eliza
9.50am Children clean as per helper charts
Who: Eliza
Transition from Outdoors to indoors
Who: Tayla
Assist with transition
Who: Cherie
 10am Planned group time (Topic/interest/family input)
Who: Emma H
 Set up room
Who: Tayla
Word wall
Who: Emma H
10.40am Free play as planned with children A-Frame indoor/Outdoor
11.10 Direct children to pack away
11.20am Small group/Table activities
Table 1 – Name recognition/writing
Eliza
Table 2 – Art and craft table
Who: Cherie
Table 3 – Will change depending on interests/family input
Who: Tayla
Group 4 will complete an activity on the mat
Who: Emma H
12pm Yoga or brain gym
Who: Tayla
Put beds out
Who: Eliza
Nappy change/rest nappies
Who: Eliza
12.15pm Lunch set up by children as per helper chart:
Who: Emma H
12.30pm Quiet time/Rest time
Who – Emma  H
Sit with resting/sleeping kids
Who: Eliza
Clean up after lunch
Who: Tayla
Look at the strength tree
Who: Eliza
Mop the floor
Who: Emma H
Write on curriculum
Who: Tayla
Bathroom Cleaning
Who:  Cherie
  Curriculum
Who: Cherie
Set up for lesson plans
Who: Eliza
2pm Lesson plans (Small groups)
Who: Emma H
Lesson plans (Small groups)
Who: Cherie
Lesson plans (Small groups)
Who: Tayla
2.30pm Group time
– What was the best thing about school today?
– What didn’t you like?
– How can we make it better?
Who: Eliza
Nappy change/remove rest nappies
Who: Tayla
Write on curriculum
Who: Emma H
Add new words to word wall
Who: Tayla
3pm Progressive/Afternoon Tea
Who: Tayla
Singing/Dancing/dramatic play
Who: Cherie
Curriculum
Who:  Eliza
3.30pm Refer to Helper chart – recycling, watering plants
Who: Tayla
Bags packed, shoes, hats and sunscreen on
Who: Cherie
Tidy lockers & take washing to the laundry
Who: Eliza
All parents taken to the curriculum wall and described children’s learning
Who: All staff
A-Frame – Choose again what the children want to do
Who: Eliza
4pm Outside Play
Who: Cherie
Outside play
Who: Tayla
Clean room:
Eliza
4.30pm Go inside and remaining children discuss what they want to do tomorrow
Who: Cherie
5pm Prepare the room with the children
Who: Eliza
6pm Finish

[/ms-user]

Who to talk to about what?

[ms-user]

Practical Management – Who to talk to about what?

What I find in most services is educators asking the wrong person for help because they don’t know who does what. I’ve talked about runny poo on many occasions because I’ll never forget the time I watched five people waste so much time investigating a child’s runny poo and collectively attempting and failing to decide what the best action was to move forward. When people don’t know who to talk to, they waste their own time and that of all the other people who should not be involved.

Educators

Educators talk to their Room Leaders about:
  • their roster
  • room routines
  • training needs
  • curriculum eg planning, activities, extending learning, intentional teaching
  • children’s portfolios
  • learning documentation eg learning stories, child reflections, strength trees, photos
  • assessing children’s learning
  • room displays
  • cleaning responsibilities
  • resources and equipment - new or replacement
  • difficulties with other team members they can’t resolve directly with the person
  • any issues that affect their job
  • difficulties managing children’s behaviour
  • service operations
  • their own special skills, hobbies etc so these may be used to strengthen the curriculum (can be areas not related to childcare)
  • policies or procedures
  • learning outcomes, NQS elements and Regs
  • individual children eg health needs, children’s medication and/or medical plans, interests, comfort routines, family structure
  • individual families eg jobs, names, family structure, hobbies, holidays
  • how to improve everyday skills and procedures eg teaching, documenting, reflecting, talking to families, managing and interacting with children, identifying behavioural needs, time management
  • feedback for Quality Improvement Plan
  • templates and forms
  • record keeping and filing
Educators share information with other educators about:
  • their own special skills, hobbies etc so these may be used to strengthen the curriculum (can be areas not related to childcare)
  • children and families that other educators may not know (only appropriate information, nothing that breaks confidentiality or is not needed to be said i.e. gossip)
  • things they’ve learnt from training/professional development
  • better ways to do things eg including children’s names in the stories they’re reading
  • their movements during the day, especially if supervising children. For example I’m taking Ava in for a Nappy Change now…I’m taking these four children to the printer to get or learning stories.
  Educators talk to Educational Leader about:
  • curriculum eg planning, activities, extending learning, intentional teaching
  • compiling children’s portfolios
  • completing learning documentation eg learning stories, child reflections, strength trees, photos
  • assessing children’s learning
  • their reflective practice and critical reflections
  • their own special skills, hobbies etc so these may be used to strengthen the curriculum (can be areas not related to childcare)
  • learning outcomes
Educators teach, coach, then assess trainees in:
  • policies and procedures
  • learning outcomes, NQS elements and Regs
  • curriculum eg planning, activities, extending learning, intentional teaching
  • compiling children’s portfolios
  • completing learning documentation eg learning stories, child reflections, strength trees, photos
  • assessing children’s learning
  • making beautiful room displays
  • their cleaning responsibilities
  • their knowledge about individual children eg their health needs, medication and/or medical plans, interests, comfort routines, family structure
  • their knowledge about individual families eg jobs, names, family structure, hobbies, holidays
  • everyday skills and procedures eg teaching, documenting, reflecting, talking to families, managing and interacting with children, nappy changing and toileting, the correct way to complete an incident/accident form if they were a witness
  • templates and forms used
  • record keeping and filing
  Educators talk to Nominated Supervisor about:
  • personal illness, injury etc that affects their work
  • difficulties with other team members that they can’t resolve directly with the person or with the help of the Room Leader
  • any issues that affect their job if Room Leader can’t resolve them
Educators talk to Administration Manager about:
  • pay issues
  • qualifications eg updating First Aid or Child Protection Clearance, working towards qualifications
  • enrolment of children information relevant for their room

Trainees

Trainees talk to Educators and the Room Leader about:
  • rosters
  • policies and procedures
  • learning outcomes, NQS elements and Regs
  • curriculum eg planning, activities, extending learning, intentional teaching
  • compiling children’s portfolios
  • learning documentation eg learning stories, child reflections, strength trees, photos
  • assessing children’s learning
  • making beautiful room displays
  • cleaning responsibilities
  • individual children eg their health needs, medication and/or medical plans, interests, comfort routines, family structure
  • individual families eg jobs, names, family structure, hobbies, holidays
  • how to improve everyday skills and procedures eg teaching, documenting, reflecting, talking to families, managing and interacting with children, nappy changing and toileting, how to complete incident forms
  • templates and forms used
  • record keeping and filing
  • service operations
Trainees talk to Administration Manager about:
  • holiday plans
  • pay issues
  • qualifications eg working towards qualifications
  Trainees talk to Nominated Supervisor about:  
  • sick leave
  • personal illness, injury etc that affects their work
  • difficulties with other team members that they can’t resolve directly with the person or with the help of the Room Leader
  • holidays

Room Leaders

Room Leaders teach, coach, then assess educators and trainees in areas that need improving eg:
  • relevant policies and procedures eg nappy changing and toileting
  • learning outcomes, NQS elements and Regs
  • basing daily program on family input and children’s lives, extending learning, intentional teaching
  • compiling children’s portfolios
  • completing learning documentation eg learning stories, child reflections, strength trees, photos
  • assessing children’s learning
  • making beautiful room displays
  • their cleaning responsibilities
  • their knowledge of individual families eg parents’ names and jobs
  • everyday skills and procedures eg documenting, reflecting, talking to families, managing and interacting with children teaching, identifying behavioural needs, time management, how to complete incident forms
Room Leaders talk to educators and trainees about:
  • rosters
  • their training needs
  • room routines
  • curriculum eg planning, activities
  • resources and equipment - new or replacement
  • managing children’s behaviour
  • service operations eg information they’ve learnt that team members may not know
  • their own special skills, hobbies etc so these may be used to strengthen the curriculum (can be areas not related to childcare)
  • policies or procedures
  • learning outcomes, NQS elements and Regs
  • individual children eg their health needs, medication and/or medical plans, interests, comfort routines, family structure
  • individual families eg jobs, names, family structure, hobbies, holidays
  • feedback for Quality Improvement Plan
  • information they’ve learnt about children and families
information they’ve learnt while completing training/professional development better ways to do things eg speaking to children at their eye level their movements during the day, especially if supervising children   Room Leaders talk to Administration Manager about: new families and children eg enrolment information holiday plans pay issues qualifications eg updating First Aid or Child Protection Clearance templates and forms used record keeping and filing service operations Room Leaders talk to Nominated Supervisor about: personal illness, injury etc that affects their work difficulties with team members that they can’t resolve directly with the person educator and trainee training needs any issues that affect their ability to manage the room or do their job

Families

Families talk to Nominated Supervisor about:

  • issues they can’t resolve with Room Leader
  • service operations
  • complaints, suggestions, feedback
  • obtaining information to support parenting and families
  • problems with educators they can’t resolve with the Room Leader
  • complaints related to the Room Leader
  • content of policies and procedures

Families talk to Administration Manager about:

  • enrolment
  • fee payments
  • child’s attendance
  • planned holidays
  • updated information eg current enrolment, immunisation, emergency contact details
  • service operations
  • parent information library
  • location of policies and procedures

Families talk to Room Leader about:

  • their child’s learning and development
  • what’s in learning program
  • their child’s learning records
  • their child’s friendships and groups
  • their child’s social interactions
  • behaviour issues
  • service operations
  • obtaining brochures or contacts which support parenting and families

Administration Manager

Administration Manager talks to Room Leaders about:

  • updated information for children and families (relevant to teaching and relationships)
  • students, volunteers and relief staff
  • location and supply of forms and templates
  • filing of records

Administration Manager talks to Educators about:

  • qualifications eg updating First Aid or Child Protection Clearance, working towards qualifications

Administration Manager talks to Nominated Supervisor about:

  • complaints, suggestions, feedback
  • late fees
  • budget
  • relevant staffing issues eg staff holidays
  • students, volunteers and relief staff
  • staff rosters
  • new enrolments
  • terminating families
  • occupancy rates

Nominated Supervisor

Nominated Supervisor talks to Administration Manager about:

  • students, volunteers and relief staff
  • financial information eg budget

occupancy rates

Nominated Supervisor talks to Room Leader about:

  • difficulties with staff they can’t resolve directly with the person
  • training needs – their own and those of educators and trainees
  • management of room
  • children’s curriculum, learning documentation and portfolios
  • communication with families
  • feedback for Quality Improvement Plan

Nominated Supervisor talks to Educational Leader about:

  • children’s curriculum, learning documentation and portfolios
  • communication with families
  • educators’ training needs

[/ms-user]

Using core values for non-performance

[ms-user]

File Note: Core Values


<Insert date>

Re: Record of meeting with ;regarding not meeting our core values

Today at <insert time>, I met with <insert employee’s name>. Also present was <insert names of any other people at the meeting>.

During the meeting I explained to <insert employee’s name>that she had not met core value <insert core value/s>when<insert description of behaviour discussed>.

<Insert employee’s name> said in response that <insert details of what you believe the employee said/advised/explained>.

In order to assist <insert employee’s name> to meet our core values, I <insert details of what steps you have taken or offered and any deadlines, targets, expectations that you have set the employee for improvement>.

e.g. In order to assist Jane Doe to meet our core values, I arranged for her to shadow me while I performed the task so she could observe the expected behaviour.

<Record any other details of the meeting that you have not yet written.>

At the end of the meeting I <insert details of anything else that occurred at the end of the meeting, for example if you gave the person a warning letter or if you set a date for a follow up meeting you should note that here>.

e.g. At the end of the meeting I informed Jane Doe that if her performance did not improve a First Written Warning would be issued.

Signed:_______________________________________________              Date:______ /_______ /

Print name:


[/ms-user]

What are core values?

[ms-user]

Core Values

What are core values? Core values are a description of the behaviours that you value in your service. Good leaders recognise that core values help achieve quality practices and implement practices to ensure their employees meet these values at all times. The best way to develop core values is to identify what annoys you and what you repeatedly need to ask educators to do.

How to use core values

  • Use them in your job descriptions
  • Use them as a tool to discover what your educators are doing well or where they need to improve
  • Use them as file notes for non-performance.
What annoys you and what you repeatedly need to ask educators to do Rewrite the annoying aspects and repeated requests into a positive statement
Educators are grouped together talking and not supervising the children. Children are always supervised.
OMG what was left up against the fence - a collection of items that could become a ladder. We immediately remove unsafe elements or make them safe.

Core Values

  1. We are always professional

1.1   we are polite, respectful and thoughtful to everyone

1.2   we are well presented, clean and well groomed

1.3   we speak positively about our Service, Educators, Staff and Managers

1.4   we maintain confidentiality at all times

 

  1. We are a strong, respectful and happy team

2.1   we support and respect each other, sharing knowledge and ideas

2.2   we take responsibility for our role and duties

2.3   we work with others to achieve common goals

2.4   we communicate achievements and concerns with the appropriate people

2.5   we embrace change and continuous improvement

 

  1. We value our families and local community

3.1.  we always greet and interact with families

3.2   we know their names, occupations and hobbies

3.3   we represent our Service with pride at work and in the community

3.4   we know our families and community are our most important asset

3.5   we are always working to connect families and communities with our Service

3.6   we discuss each child’s interactions, achievements and interests with their families daily

3.7   we consider each family’s perspective

3.8   we always encourage family input and explain how this is used to develop our curriculum

 

  1. We build strong, trusting and loving relationships with children

4.1   we use “Attachment Theory and Circle of Security”

4.2   we greet each child by getting down to their level, using their name and looking into their eyes

4.3   we use Robyn Dolby’s method of receiving children ie “I’m here to look after you and keep you safe until Mum/Dad returns”

4.4   we treat each child with respect, take the time to listen to them and engage with them during the day and especially in play

 

  1. Our children are always safe and clean

5.1   children are always supervised

5.2   children are clean and well-presented when collected

5.3   children’s belongings are packed before they are collected

5.4   we immediately take action to remove or reduce any identified risk

5.5   we know each child’s medical needs and allergies

5.6   infectious or ill children are always sent home

5.7   we always follow all our policies and procedures

 

 

  1. Our play, learning and work environments are always safe, clean and inviting

6.1   we regularly complete risk assessments for all areas

6.2   we immediately remove unsafe elements or make them safe

6.3   we ensure all areas are tidy, organised and welcoming, including the yard

6.4   we remove broken and dirty resources

6.5   we always adhere to service cleaning schedules

 

  1. We take every opportunity to showcase the quality of our Service

7.1   we display children’s learning in a visually appealing way

7.2   we celebrate learning activities and achievements with children and families

7.3   our environment setups are like ‘shop windows’ which showcase the amazing learning children engage in when families are at work

7.5   we talk to families every day about children’s activities and learning

 

  1. We are ALWAYS the best Educators we can be

8.1   we are ALWAYS trying to improve our practices

8.2   we are open to new ideas

8.3   we take advantage of professional development and learning opportunities

8.4   if we don’t know something we co-learn with the children

8.5   we regularly reflect on our practices and service operations with a view to continuous improvement

8.6   nothing is ever ‘good enough’, we can always improve

8.7   we don’t use stencils or produce ‘same same’ art

8.8   we interact with children in small groups

 

  1. We know the Regulations, Policies and Procedures thoroughly

9.1   we know there is a Regulation, Policy or Procedure for everything that happens at the Service

9.2   if we’re unsure of the Regulation, Policy or Procedure we know where to find out

9.3   we know following the Regulations, Policies and Procedures achieves the best outcome

 

  1. We complete our documentation on time

10.1 we complete learning documentation and our curriculum with the children

10.2 we design innovative ways which encourage families and children to help complete learning documentation

10.3 we complete incident reports and other compliance documentation immediately

10.4 we document each child’s progress in achieving the EYLF/MTOP learning outcomes


[/ms-user]

Get to know yourself and use this to lead others

[ms-user]

Look at each of the self-knowledge statements below.  Think about yourself and where your own attitudes and behaviours fall on the five-part scale, then check the score that best indicates where you are at the present time.  Total your scores.  (Remember to make copies of the worksheet before you begin, so you can complete this self-evaluation every so often.)

Self-evaluation requires you to be completely honest with yourself.  The only right answers are honest answers.  The more honest and objective you can be, the more you’ll be contributing to your own self-development and leadership skills.

Self-Knowledge Statement Completely Very Much Somewhat Hardly Not at All
I’m aware of my values. 5 4 3 2 1
I’ve created a set of values I want to be most important to me. 5 4 3 2 1
I’m aware of my beliefs. 5 4 3 2 1
I’ve created a set of beliefs that I want to guide my life. 5 4 3 2 1
I can identify the difference between an assumption and a fact. 5 4 3 2 1
I understand the pervasiveness of assumptions in day-to-day situations. 5 4 3 2 1
I’m aware of my own assumptions in daily situations. 5 4 3 2 1
I make it a practice to “check out” my assumptions. 5 4 3 2 1
I’m aware of the different ways I impact other people. 5 4 3 2 1
I discuss with people the impact we have on each other. 5 4 3 2 1
I consciously try to minimise the negative impact I have on other people. 5 4 3 2 1
I know that I avoid certain things that are hard for me. 5 4 3 2 1
I can identify those things that I avoid. 5 4 3 2 1
I can identify why I avoid those things. 5 4 3 2 1
I consciously try to learn ways to make hard things easier and not avoid them. 5 4 3 2 1
I know my feelings about being in unknown or uncertain situations. 5 4 3 2 1
I can identify specific situations that are unknown or uncertain situations for me. 5 4 3 2 1
I know what I give up by avoiding the unknown. 5 4 3 2 1
I consciously welcome being in unknown or uncertain situations. 5 4 3 2 1
I embrace the idea that self-knowledge is vital for effective leadership. 5 4 3 2 1

TOTAL SCORE:

84 to 100 Outstanding!  You have a deep and true understanding of yourself that enhances your leadership abilities.

68 to 83 Very good.  You’re well on your way to understanding yourself.

52 to 67 Above average.  But there’s lots of room for growth.

36 to 51 You have a lot of exciting self-discovery ahead!

20 to 35 Don’t be discouraged.  It’s never too late to start learning about yourself.


[/ms-user]

Recognise the things that are “hard” for you and how to avoid them

[ms-user]

If you’re honest with yourself, you know that there are some things that are just plain “hard” for you, and you’ve probably become expert at avoiding them. You may be so good at avoiding them that you don’t even realise you’re doing so. You could call them weaknesses, inabilities, tendencies, your “nature,” or you could put a positive spin on them and call them opportunities. But whatever you call them, it’s important to be aware of what they are for you.

What kinds of things are we talking about? People avoid things like:

  • Delegating work to others and continue to do things that others could and should be doing
  • Telling educatorsthey’re unhappy with their performance and exactly why, and just gently coax, drop hints, offer “suggestions,” or transfer them
  • Speaking in front of large groups of people, and instead write memos or have somebody else do their talking for them.

There’s an endless list of what people avoid, and everyone’s list is different.

What’s wrong with not doing the things you don’t like to do?

You can’t possibly do everything anyway, so why not focus on what you like to do and what’s easy for you, and not worry about those things that are hard?

First, not addressing those “hard” things almost always prevents you from getting what you really want. For example, a Nominated Supervisor who avoids telling educators when their work is not up to par is compromising and not getting the best results possible. (Not to mention the ripple effect it has on other educators and the families.)

Second, a lot of energy and attention is “sucked up” – wasted really by these avoidance techniques.

Third, when avoidance becomes habitual and unconscious – when you don’t even realise that the avoidance has become automatic – you lose the ability to choose which is fundamental, not only to leadership, but to life. When you give up your ability to choose how you’ll act in any situation, you’ve relinquished your ability to make decisions, to take the “right action,” and, thereby, damaged your effectiveness.

When you continually avoid those things that are hard for you, you deny yourself the opportunity to make them easy. You deny yourself the fullest of what’s possible.

Identify those things that are hard for you, the underlying beliefs you have about them, how you avoid them, what you gain by avoiding them, what you would gain by not having to avoid them, and whether or not you want to change.

Consider the following questions:

  1. What are the things that are hard for you?
  2. What are your underlying beliefs?
  3. How do you avoid the hard things?
  4. What do you gain by avoiding the hard things?
  5. What would you gain by having the choice to avoid or not avoid?
  6. Do you want to change it?

[/ms-user]

Why you need to know the impact you have on others

[ms-user]

The impact you have on others can dramatically affect your ability to function effectively as a leader. The vast majority of people have no idea of their impact other people – absolutely no idea.

Your impact is how you make other people feel.It’s  created by the way you look, by the way you talk and listen, by the way you respond, by your physical presence, even by what people have heard about you. You can impact people when you’re standing next to them, when you’re talking to them on the phone, or when you’re a thousand kilometres away. Impact happens in a million subtle and not-so subtle ways.

That’s only half the story. Half of how you impact other people resides within the other people themselves. You impact different people in different ways, even though you, yourself, are the same. One person may find you dynamic and inspiring, while the next may find those same qualities intimidating and insincere. By trying to understand how you impact others, you will learn much about yourself and about relationships that will make you a better leader – and a better person.

Most people have a picture of themselves that is quite unlike the picture that other people have of them. You might not believe this is true for you, but you need to check it out. What kind of an impact do you think you have on other people? How does this compare with the kind of impact you’d like to have? And, finally, how do you really impact other people from their perspective?

Consider your responses to the following:

  1. What kind of impact would you like to have on other people?
  2. List3 people you’d like to have a better understanding of your impact on. As a guideline, select one person from your personal life, one from your work life that you have “satisfactory or better” relationship with, and one from your work life that you have “less than satisfactory” relationship with.
  3. For each person, first describe how you think you impact them and why.

To answer the next questions, you can’t just think about it. You can’t imagine what people think or feel, or “put yourself in their shoes.” You have to actually ask people what they think. You have to make it safe for them to tell you what they truly feel. This may take some time, so be patient. And, perhaps the most difficult thing of all, you must be willing to hear things you don’t want to hear.

You may be shocked by what some people tell you. You may feel hurt, or angry, or completely misunderstood. Don’t let your emotions get the better of you. You can’t ask people what they really feel, and then get angry or defensive when they tell you. The goal here is simply “information gathering.” Remember, you’ll hear a lot of positive things that you may not have known about yourself too. Consider what people tell you as objective information that you will collect, consider and use to get a better understanding of how people see you and why they react to you the way they do.

  1. Ask each person to describe for you how you actually impact them. Write down what they say, using their exact words.  Don’t argue with them or try to explain why they’re impressions are wrong or what your real intentions are.  Just gather information.
  2. How does your actual impact on others compare with what you imagined it was?
  3. What did you discover about yourself?
  4. What impacts were you satisfied with?
  5. What impacts were you not satisfied with ?

How will you use what you’ve discovered so that your impact on others is the way you really want it to be?  Create a plan for how you will improve your impact.Here are three techniques you can use:

1.Ask people to tell you the impact you’re having on them “in the moment.”

2.When you sense other people’s discomfort, ask them how they’re feeling and why.

3.Explain to people why you’re thinking, feeling and behaving the way you are.


[/ms-user]